If you can, think back to when you were diagnosed with diabetes. Can you remember much of it?

I can. I can remember almost every word that the endo, diabetes educator and dietitian said to me. I can remember that, in amongst the explanations of what diabetes was all about and how it would impact on my life, there were thinly-veiled threats about what would happen if I strayed from the plan I was being given with the expectation that I would follow it. I remember the rigid ‘my-way-or-the-highway’ instructions about how life with diabetes would be.

But mostly, I remember what was missing. There was no mention about the impact of diabetes on my emotional wellbeing. No one suggested that speaking with peers – others living with diabetes – might provide me with some much need comfort or camaraderie. No one hinted that I might like to do some of my own reading and investigating to come up with my own ideas of how to best manage this chronic condition that had moved into my body, my mind, my life.

No one told me there were options or suggested that I needed to carve out my own path and then work out to navigate it best.

If only I’d had a guide to help me do that – something to give me some ideas that felt more in line with how I lived before diabetes. I wanted something that shared real-life experience about how to make diabetes fit into an already really busy life, and help me be conscious of making healthier choices, but choices that didn’t feel as though they were suffocating me.

Now I have it – albeit 19 years too late!

Adam Brown from diaTribe has written Bright Spot and Landmines which he has sub-headed ‘The Diabetes Guide I Wish Someone Had Handed Me’. 

Click on link to be taken to the first chapter.

As I read this book, I started to think about how different those early diabetes years would have been for me – the years before I found my voice, my people and an ability to work out my own way with diabetes.

I could use words such as ‘sensible’ and ‘practical’ and ‘level-headed’ to describe the advice gently doled out in Adam’s book, and they would all be accurate.

But they would be underselling the value of the book.

Adam highlights the landmines – the things we all do to take short cuts – that inevitably negatively affect our diabetes. Often we think these short cuts save us time or ‘fix’ a diabetes problem quickly, only to find that they often turn out to be time consuming and actually end up causing more problems than the original one we were trying to address.

The bright spots are suggestions on how to positively and sustainably live with diabetes. They are easy to manage, and don’t ask for a significant shift in thinking, or large financial or even time investment to make the changes.

The book is segmented into four sections: Food, Exercise, Mindset and Sleep. This makes it super easy to use as a reference book and dive into it to help target specific areas that you want to think about. I’ve read the whole book through twice now, but keep going back to the sleep section, because I realised that it is an area of my life that I really need to address now.

I honestly wish that the day I’d been diagnosed with diabetes I’d been handed this book. I wish I’d had it on my shelf all those years as a resource to refer back to in moments of burnout or no motivation, or when I needed a little push to encourage me. I wish I’d been able to tap into Adam’s wisdom on specific issues when I was struggling with being in a food rut that was affecting my glucose levels, or in a funk because my mind was not clear or focused.

I’m so glad to have it now and have already made some changes which have been very positive. It might be 19 years late to the party, but this book will be on my shelf to be pulled down very, very often.

It doesn’t matter how long you’ve had diabetes; you WILL get something out of Adam’s book. But if you or a loved one is newly diagnosed, I would recommend you stopping whatever you are doing RIGHT NOW and getting a copy. You can buy a paperback copy here, or download the PDF here, naming your own price.

If you would like to win a copy of Bright Spots and Landmines, I can hook you up! Adam generously provided me with some copies when I caught up with him recently at ADA. Just click here and tell me in 25 words or fewer why you would like to win a copy of Bright Spots and Landmines. But chop chop! You’ve only got until the end of the weekend to enter. 

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