New York in the rain is quite magical. That’s probably something only tourists say, but it’s what I was thinking as I emerged from the subway, way, way downtown on a cold and wet January afternoon early this year.

I hurried along the busy business district streets to my destination – an old cosy pub, chosen by the local I was meeting because of its historical significance (which you can read about here).

I was catching up with a diabetes friend – one of the smartest people in the game – to chat about what was going on in our respective diabetes worlds.

After a while, we started talking about how exciting new tech developments will be finally coming to market in just a few short years. And then, he told me about Loop, showing me his phone and briefly explaining what it was all about.

I was enthralled. ‘Wait,’ I said. ‘So, your iPhone now drives your pump? And basal rates are adjusted automatically?… Whoa! Send me all you can about it,’ I pleaded, after he promised that it wasn’t that difficult to set up.

This was back in January. It’s now August. In the intervening months, I read through the documents and have had conversations both on and offline about Loop and what it does. I searched through my diabetes cupboard for the pump I’d need (finding my old-school Medtronic 522 hidden away).

In May, I bit the bullet and ordered one of the components required to build my rig. About ten days later, a box arrived and inside was a tiny little computer and battery – my RileyLink. I took them out of their packaging, running my fingers over them gently… and then got scared and popped them back in the box, and left the box at the back of my desk.

Hello RileyLink!

Every time I sat down to work, I’d see the box and sometimes I’d take a peek inside again. And then I’d read the documents again, each time a little more committed to get started.

In San Diego, I chatted with a few people who had taken the leap to Loop, everyone telling me that it was life changing and also promising that it wasn’t too hard to set up. I kept having conversations on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram with people from all around the world who were Looping, every one of them urging me to get on the bandwagon and offering to answer any questions I’d have.

I joined Facebook groups, continued to read over the documents, and every time I was ready to go, I freaked out about how technologically advanced it all sounded, and how technologically inept I am, and shut everything away.

Until ten days ago. Ten days ago, I did take the leap. I read through the Loop documents another time. I told myself that I could do it. And I started. Step 1….

I hit a snag a few steps in, but fortunately was meeting a Twitter friend on Wednesday to chat. He is not technologically inept. In fact, he is the complete opposite and answered all my (probably rather silly) questions and didn’t even roll his eyes once.

I went home with Loop installed on my phone and proceeded to enter all my settings into it.

I played around with the app and before I knew it, I was blousing directly from my phone (rather than from my pump):

After a couple of days of running open loop, I took the plunge and switched to closed loop. And waited and watched. The circle on the top left hand corner of the app closed and I waited for the automation to begin. And begin it did!

‘OHMYGOD,’ I squealed to Aaron, as the first basal adjustment was made. ‘LOOK AT THIS! IT’S ADJUSTING MY BASAL RATES ALL ON ITS OWN. LOOK, BABE. LOOK!!! THIS IS JUST LIKE YOUR PANCREAS…Except it’s a mobile phone, mini-computer thingy, insulin pump and Dexcom. BUT I’M JUST LIKE YOU!!!’ To his credit, Aaron nodded his head, pretended he was as excited as me, and agreed that this was EXACTLY the same as a functioning pancreas.

I admit to being more than a little fascinated and obsessed with watching what Loop is doing and the accuracy of its predictions.

This morning’s waking Dex number. And the Loop app showing me how we got there…

I’m only a few very short days in and already, I can see that this is giving me a whole lot more insight into my diabetes. I had a very minor car accident the other morning and seeing the adrenalin spike, and how Loop managed to deal with it, was amazing. I would have rage bolused the spike which would have inevitably resulted in a low. Instead, I resisted the urge to bolus and allowed an increased basal adjustment to bring me back into range slowly and safely.

Obviously, as with everything to do with diabetes, Loop isn’t for everyone. But for me – firmly in a diabetes rut and living in pump limbo – this has been just what I’ve needed to get me re-engaged.

My clever mate David (who is running Open APS) 3D printed me a case for my RileyLink. In pink, to match my pump.

Wait! What is Loop? If you are interested in reading about Loop and how to get up and running, all the info is here.

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