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How’s your Christmas shopping going? Have you managed to get it all done and wrapped everything up in beautiful vintage newspaper with contrasting artisanal twine? Have you hand-addressed all the gifts on mistletoe leaves, and had Christmas elves bless the bounty? Have you stuffed everyone’s stockings with scented candles, socks and undies, and photo frames?

Yeah, me neither!

Starting to panic? About to head to a frantically busy shopping centre with a million other disorganised and stressed shoppers? Or have you already popped into a local chemist to clear them out of their toiletries packs?

Well, put down the bath bomb! I can help. And the best bit – you can do it all from your kitchen table, while lounging on the sofa, or sipping an iced latte at your local café, which is what I am doing as I am writing this little post.

Children and adults are dying because they can’t access insulin. I don’t mean to rain down on your Christmas parade or tangle your tinsel, but this is the cold harsh truth. It is happening every single day. I know I don’t have to remind most people who read this blog that insulin is not a new or experimental treatment. You all know that it’s been around for close to 100 years.

Insulin should be easy to come by for every single person in the world who needs it to treat their diabetes, but unfortunately, that’s not the case.

I don’t know about you, but this fact makes me angry and despair.  The idea that people are dying because they cannot access the very drug that I can easily pick up at any chemist in my neighbourhood actually hurts my brain.

But what if you could make a difference and actually get insulin to those in need AND skip department store queues as you line up to pay for some gift that will probably end up being re-gifted in next year’s office Secret Santa? (Don’t look at me like that – we’ve all done it!)

Well, you can, and it’s as simple as making a donation to a charity that is helping to get insulin into the hands – and bodies – of those who need it most. You can make gifts in the name of any or all of your friends and family, and I bet that they will understand why you have forsaken the novelty cup you usually buy them to do this instead.

When anyone asks me what I want for Christmas – and even if they don’t ask – I say ‘Please make a donation to either Insulin for Life or Life for a Child’.

My parents are doing that for me this year, and truly, it is the best present they could give me – I couldn’t be more pleased.

Click image to donate to Insulin for Life

 

Click image to donate to Life for a Child.

No one loses here. You avoid screaming kids and whimpering adults at shopping centres, no one gets a pointless gift they have to pretend to have always wanted. And someone is given the gift of insulin, or rather, the gift of life.

Now that’s the spirit of Christmas!

Advertisements

Towards the end of last week, I got a little rant-y at all the ads from Australian-based and owned companies filling up my social feeds, and my inbox, inviting me to shop up big in the Black Friday sales.

My understanding of Black Friday sales is that they happen the day after Thanksgiving. We don’t have Thanksgiving in Australia. And therefore, we don’t have Black Friday. I actually had to do a bit or reading up to find out the history of the whole Black Friday sale thing, because I’ve always associated the term (as do many Aussies) with bushfires from back in 1939 – not a fire sale of bed linen or mascara.

After Friday was done, it wasn’t over! By Saturday, suddenly, Black Friday ads morphed into Cyber Monday ads. And details of more sales flooded every online channel. Cue more ranting from me (who probably should get a hobby and stop complaining about crap).

Today, with all the consumerism over, it appears that it’s time for another catchy day: Giving Tuesday. But this time, I’m all over it and happy to get involved and will be making a couple of donations to charities supporting people who are unable to access basic diabetes supplies.

Diabetes is just such an un-level playing field. Some of us are in Facebook groups trying to work out how to source equipment for our DIY APS builds, while for others, sourcing insulin is impossible.

This quote from former IDF President, Professor Jean Claude Mbanya provides some much needed perspective, reminding us just how different life with diabetes can be around the world.

If you can, please consider making a donation to a diabetes charity. You can choose to go local, and support a charity that provides services to you and people in your area. Or you can look to charities supporting people with diabetes in less well-resourced countries.

Maybe you could get together with some friends or family or work colleagues and donate to the Life for a Child 1,000 Donors Campaign. Already, 113 generous people have pledged to give $1 a day to help provide insulin to children in need.

Alternatively, you can always donate to the Spare a Rose, Save a Child campaign (also supporting Life for a Child) where just AUD$6 per month is all it takes to provide a child with insulin.

Insulin for Life saves perfectly good insulin from landfill and transports it to people in countries where insulin is difficult to access. Learn more about Insulin for Life by watching this short YouTube clip and then donate here.

Giving Tuesday, while really only a US thing, is something I am more than happy to embrace. As we throw ourselves headfirst into the silly season, I think it’s really important to remember those who can do with some help. And with Xmas spending about to hit frenzy levels, stopping and thinking about how you and your family and family can help those in need. (Read here for a slightly Grinch-esque idea, but one that I still stand by 100 per cent!)

In Australia, WDD lasts for about 36 hours. From the first ‘Happy World Diabetes Day!’ to the final SoMe post with the #WDD hashtag, it was a day-and-a-half of diabetes activism and advocacy and awareness raising. Thank the gods it’s over!

Here a collection of things I’ve found interesting and wanted to share from this week…and most of them are by or about real life Diabetes SuperSHEroes!

One dollar a day

On World Diabetes Day, Life for a Child launched their new 1,000 Donor Campaign. An ongoing donation of USD$1 per day will ensure a child with diabetes has access to life-saving insulin. 1,000 donors will help 1,000 young people in need.

Read more about the campaign, and learn how to donate, here.

Merch!

My wardrobe at the moment seems to be predominantly made up of diabetes t-shirts. Most of them have a very clear Loop theme…I wonder why! (Here is where to get to find these designs.)

And then, this week, I received this in the post from Casualty Girl and it is definitely going to be on high rotation this summer:


Also, from Casualty Girl, a new pouch to house my glucose meter (to go along with my diabetes spares bag):


Casualty Girl is the brainchild of talented designer Monica Vesci, a complete and utter star in diabetes sartorial excellence! Have a look at her e-shop for these products and lots more here.

 Diabetes and feminism

My post on Monday about privilege and diabetes generated a lot of discussion. I wish I could say that was the end of the chatter and cries of ‘What about me?’ because of the women and diabetes theme, but, alas, it was not.

Georgie Peters, who I adore and admire, wrote a great piece on her blog about the issue too. Read it here.

Something fun

Sure, it’s just a bit of fun, but lots of people have had a giggle as they worked out their name using the Diabetes Australia SuperHEro Name Generator.

Mine is Phantom Islet Injector. Which, when you think about it, is actually kinda true!

Carolyn’s Robot Relative

Another amazing woman, Dana Lewis, has added yet more strings to her bow, and is now a published children’s book author. I received my copy of ‘Carolyn’s Robot Relative’ on Monday.


It’s a great way to explain diabetes devices (and other health gadgets) to kids.

You can get your own copy on Amazon here, and because Dana is wonderful, she she will using any profits from the sales of the book to cover the cost of copies she will donate to schools and hospitals. She really is one of the best people in the diabetes community!

How to NOT be ‘patient-centric’

PHARMAC, the New Zealand government agency that decides which pharmaceutical and medical devices to publicly fund in NZ, announced this week a new sole arrangement to limit glucose monitoring to meters and strips from Pharmaco (NZ), distributors of Caresens products.

This means that people with diabetes in NZ able to access subsidised meters and strips will have access to only four meters.

Not a great result for people with diabetes who want choice in their diabetes devices, is it? More here.

Insulin affordability in the US

Laura Marston has been a long-time advocate for affordable insulin for people living with diabetes in the USA.

She wrote this piece for the BMJ Blog about her own story of managing insulin affordability, explaining that since her diagnosis in 1996, the list price of a vial of Humalong has risen by over 1200 per cent (that’s not a typo).

Read Laura’s piece to get a good understanding of the situation in the US, and just how messed up – and tough – it is for people with diabetes just trying to afford the drug they need to stay alive.

Asha’s diabulimia story

Asha Brown founded, and is now the Executive Director of, We Are Diabetes, an organisation supporting, and providing information and education for people living with diabetes and diabetes-related eating disorders.

She has written this important piece about living with diabulimia that is a must-read for anyone and everyone affected by diabetes.

What’s next?

There’s no rest for the wicked! The end of WDD does not signal the finish of diabetes activities for the year. In just over two weeks’ time, the IDF’s World Diabetes Congress kicks off and it’s the only large-scale diabetes congress to have a whole stream dedicated to living with diabetes. Lots of diabetes advocates from all over the world will be there. You can start to look through the program here.

Of course I made Blue Circle cookies for WDD. 

I used this recipe, (thanks Nigella), and put to use the cookie cutter I bought for this very purpose back in February!

Each year for World Diabetes Day (WDD), the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) selects a theme and develops a suite of information resources. Member Associations of the IDF are encouraged to take on the theme, adapting the message to their country. In previous years, themes have included eye health and diabetes, access to healthy food, and diabetes education and prevention.

This year, the focus is women living with and affected by diabetes. And apparently, some people are not happy.

There are murmurings on a number of SoMe pages that the theme is discriminatory. Men have diabetes, too! And men care for people with diabetes! Why the focus on women? It’s not all about women, you know!

I’ve had a look through all the IDF materials and other WDD materials from other organisations and nowhere has it said anything about men not having diabetes, or not being involved in diabetes care. That’s not the point of the campaign at all, and if that is all anyone is seeing, they are missing the point.

Why the focus on women? Because health outcomes for women – including women with diabetes – are worse than for men. Women Deliver, a leading global advocate for the health, rights and wellbeing of girls and women, has some outstanding resources that show just how significant these differences are. Some information from the IDF materials:

  • As a result of socioeconomic conditions, girls and women with diabetes experience barriers in accessing cost-effective diabetes prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment and care, particularly in developing countries.
  • Socioeconomic inequalities expose women to the main risk factors of diabetes, including poor diet and nutrition, physical inactivity, tobacco consumption and harmful use of alcohol.
  • Stigmatisation and discrimination faced by people with diabetes are particularly pronounced for girls and women, who carry a double burden of discrimination because of their health status and the inequalities perpetrated in male dominated societies.
  • These inequalities can discourage girls and women from seeking diagnosis and treatment, preventing them from achieving positive health outcomes.

And these points don’t even mention women’s health issues such as diabetes and pregnancy, or reproductive and sexual health.

The campaign is not suggesting that men do not experience struggles when it comes to living with diabetes themselves, or are not involved and integral in the care of others living with diabetes.

But it’s not just the exclusion of men in this year’s campaign that seems to be a problem for some. I’ve seen a number of people complain because they feel the IDF materials are not talking about the great things women with diabetes can do. We can work! We can travel! We can have healthy babies! We can jump out of aeroplanes! We can be successful career women! We can run marathons! We can start businesses!

Of course we bloody can. And, again, nowhere in the campaign collateral is there any suggestion that women are not capable of doing these things. And if you are one of the women who is able to achieve all of those things, despite your diabetes, that is fantastic! But it is the very definition of privilege to think that just because your life is one way, then it must be the same for everyone else – or that if something is not a problem for you then it mustn’t be a problem for anyone else.

Those of us in a position of privilege can use WDD to draw attention to those in need. We can encourage others to donate and to lobby. We can highlight the inequality and inequity of health outcomes for different groups of people. This year, it’s about women.

And you known what? I can’t wait until diabetes health outcomes are the same for everyone, regardless of gender. Because then we won’t need to have a women as a theme.

It’s not really diabetes awareness time here in Australia. We save that each year for the second week in July and then add an extra spurt of awareness raising on World Diabetes Day. But many of us still decide to jump on the bandwagon of our US friends as they spend the whole of November talking diabetes and giving everything a blue wash.

I always start the month strong, lining up blue clothes and scarves and other accessories to be worn each day. I head off for a blue manicure, regretting it pretty much the minute I walk out of the nail salon. I change my profile picture, and add blue circles to all my photos. I write about every awareness and advocacy activity that comes my way.

By the time 14 November rolls around, I’m already starting to feel exhausted and over the whole thing and by the time my birthday hits in the final few days of the month, I’m ready to slap anyone who wants me to wear blue. All the different initiatives start to roll into one and I can’t remember what I’ve mentioned and what I’ve forgotten to spruik.

So this year I’ve decided to do things a little differently. I knew that I needed to make a change to my usual gung-ho approach when I shared a fun post-a-different-diabetes-photo-every-day Instagram challenge this morning and realised that I was feeling a little ambivilent. I was already feeling the pressure of deciding what to post and didn’t want to commit to posting a diabetes-related photo every day to my socials. So I deleted the post and thought about what I really wanted to achieve this month. And I decided that I want to take a gentle approach to my awareness efforts.

This year, when I get to the end of November, and look back over the month, I’m okay if my SoMe feeds are not a daily reminder of awareness-raising activities. I’m fine with not telling every single person I see that it’s diabetes awareness month and then share one new fact about diabetes for them to commit to memory. I can live with not being sartorially blue or navy or aqua or sapphire for the next thirty days.

Maybe I have some advocacy burn out. Maybe the last couple of weeks of feeling as though I’ve had to defend my treatment decisions have taken a toll.

And yes, I realise how privileged it is to say ‘I don’t want to do diabetes advocacy this month’ when I don’t need to fight for insulin or diabetes supplies. I won’t be abandoning my efforts in this space. (I know that there are some really important access activities coming up in coming weeks and I will be supporting them.)

But I am going to go easy on some of the other things I’m usually all over. And that’s okay. ‘My diabetes; my rules’ extends to how much we want to talk about it. So this year, I’m talking less. I’m not hitching a ride on every bandwagon and I’m taking it easy with the online activism. I’m going less blue and I am absolutely fine with that. T1D will still look like me. (Oh, but I probably will still get a blue manicure. And I’ll probably still regret it.)

Last night, I attended an event at Parliament House in Canberra, acknowledging and celebrating two milestones: 60 years of Diabetes Australia and 30 years of the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS).

I spent the night chasing down people who were instrumental in the establishment of the NDSS to thank them for their efforts and try to explain just how significant the Scheme has been in my diabetes life for the last (almost) 20 years.

I never knew diabetes before the NDSS. On the day following my diagnosis, after spending the morning seeing my new best friends (endo, CDE, dietitian…actually, the dietitian and I never hit it off), I took a couple of freshly-filled-in forms to 100 Collins Street in the city and took a creaky elevator to the third floor. It was there I was introduced to the NDSS. I handed over the registration form and then the order form. Box after box was piled onto the counter in front of me and I looked at the unfamiliar words on unfamiliar boxes wondering where I was going to put it all and how much it was going to cost.

A few boxes of needle tips for insulin pens and a few boxes of glucose strips and a box or two of urine strips. It was tallied up and I was surprised that it wasn’t a lot more expensive. I was given a card and told to bring it in any time I needed further supplies.

As I came to learn about diabetes in other countries, I realised just how unique the NDSS is and how fortunate we are in Australia to have it.

I proudly speak about the NDSS to diabetes friends from all over the world. Often, these friends are astounded that the NDSS is free to join and available to everyone with diabetes. They are astonished that the price of diabetes supplies is the same for everyone and not reliant on insurance. Often they can’t get their head around the idea that we can choose which strips to use for which meter we prefer, with no interference from an insurance provider. And they simply cannot believe that while there are some limitations to the quantities that we can purchase, the amount we can access is actually quite significant, and there are allowances and exemptions for people who need more than the limits determined by the government.

The NDSS is more than a diabetes supplies program. It is intrinsically linked with Diabetes Australia who was instrumental in the establishment and implementation of the NDSS back in 1987. Diabetes Australia continues to administer the NDSS and runs all the services associated with the Scheme – from diabetes camps, information events, information resources and support services.

But more than that, Diabetes Australia continues to lobby the government to extend the NDSS. More than five years of consistent lobbying resulted in the CGM initiative being announced and launched, and Diabetes Australia is actively urging the broadening of initiative to include other groups of people with diabetes who benefit from CGM (as outlined in the original joint submission from Diabetes Australia, JDRF, ADS, ADEA and APEG). Back in 2004, following a similarly consistent campaign, pump consumables were added to the Scheme. Recently, Diabetes Australia’s responded to the stakeholder engagement regarding the listing of Freestyle Libre on the NDSS with this submission. From the initial lobbying for the introduction of the NDSS to today, the link between Diabetes Australia and the NDSS has resulted in supporting people living with diabetes and making our lives easier.

The NDSS remains the only scheme of its kind in the world. It has enjoyed bipartisan support from consecutive governments.

Of course, our health system is not perfect here in Australia. I believe that there should be more funding and more subsidies on the NDSS. I don’t believe in restricting access to glucose strips for people with type 2 diabetes not using insulin. I know that a lot of people still find the cost of diabetes prohibitive and there is still a divide between those who can afford the latest technologies and those who cannot.

But the NDSS does go a long way towards lessening the burden in some ways and I certainly am glad – and proud – that we have it.

Disclosure

I have been an employee of Diabetes Australia (and Diabetes Victoria) since 2001. I cover all costs for all NDSS products I use.

On Monday and Tuesday of this week, I attended and facilitated Abbott Diabetes Care’s #Dx2Melbourne event which brought together eleven Australian diabetes bloggers. (All my disclosures can be found at the end of this post.)

(Just a recap – the DX (or Diabetes Exchange) series of events have now been run about half a dozen times. Other than #DX2Sydney and this year’s Melbourne events, the others have been held in hard-to-take cities including Stockholm, Berlin and Lisbon and have been attended by bloggers from the UK and Europe.)

#Dx2Melbourne reunited most of the bloggers who attended last year’s event, with some new faces thrown in for good measure. I was introduced to Alana Hearn for the first time, finally got to meet diabetes yoga guru Rachel Zinman, and caught up with Helen Edwards. (All the links to the blogs of the ‘repeat offenders’ who attended #D2Sydney can be found on this post.)

Some may believe that I am naïve in saying this, but the event is not about product. In fact, apart from a 45-minute presentation – the session that kicked off the two days – there was no other discussion about Libre or any other diabetes product unless it was specifically raised by one of the bloggers. Abbott did not have a new product to push; Libre has been out for over 12 months now in Australia.

(I am not, however, naïve enough to think that events like this are not part of the health industry’s 21st century marketing strategy. But, as I said last year when responding to a comment on my blog about this, this is the 21st century marketing. And I’m glad that consumers have a place in this strategy, because it would be far worse if industry was continuing with 20th century marketing strategies which completely excluded people with diabetes, and did not offer us any opportunity to directly engage and work with industry. Any device company NOT doing this is falling way behind and needs to catch up.)

As the Abbott team stated in their welcome, the idea of the DX events is to continue their commitment to bring together people living with diabetes to share ideas. And for Abbott to get an idea of what it is that is important to people with diabetes and what makes us tick – albeit a very select and privileged sample of advocates.

With this in mind, for me, the most valuable part of the event was the discussions that were completely driven by the bloggers. In an open session where we were exploring ‘why we blog’, I listened carefully as everyone articulated their reasons for going online and sharing their stories with strangers.

Reasons varied – some do it because they simply want to tell their story, some because they love to write, some have specific issues within diabetes they want to open up for discussion, some see it as an advocacy platform. What we don’t hear – ever – is anyone saying ‘Because I want to make money doing it’.  I can be all evangelical about it and say it’s because we’re a choir of angels, but mostly I think it’s because we’re smart enough to know the limitations of what it is that we do, as well as understanding the strength is in connecting, not money-making.

We also considered the shortfalls of having an online presence.

I’m an over-sharer and I know that there is a lot I write that many others wouldn’t feel comfortable sharing – and some people have told me that it is sometimes difficult to read. I also write about issues that are of no real concern to others, and they are more than happy to let me know that I’m wasting my time and energy on such irrelevant (language) matters. I also know that as soon as I put something out there, I am opening myself up for comment – both positive and not-so-positive. We had a discussion about how we manage unwanted attention and, in the most extreme cases, trolling.

I have never regretted anything I have written or shared, and have never taken anything down because I’ve felt it was too personal. But I have had some very unwelcome and sometimes nasty comments sent my way.

I found this a really useful, but somewhat challenging, discussion. I have written about some very personal experiences, probably most notably, pregnancy loss. I’ve also written a lot about how diabetes impacts my mental health. These are two topics that are frequently hidden away, surrounded by shame and secrecy – precisely the reason that I am committed to writing about them.

However, the times I’ve been trolled – and fortunately, that hasn’t been often – it has been when I’ve shared very personal stories. They’ve been the times where I have found myself at my most vulnerable, and being so exposed makes any sort of negativity harrowing.

It was reassuring to discuss – and remind each other – that even though we are voluntarily putting ourselves online, we are not inviting people to be nasty and disrespectful. Online is real life, despite what some people may think. This is the space where many of us convene to work together, support each other and share information; it’s not a place for personal attacks.

I left the event on Tuesday feeling utterly exhausted, but also filled to the brim – a feeling that only comes after spending a solid period of time with others treading the blogging and advocacy boards. I was reminded of the similarities as well as the differences we experience living with diabetes. I felt buoyed by the various issues that draw our attention. I felt desperate at the access issues I still hear about – both here in Australia and overseas. But most of all I felt part of something that is much bigger than me, much bigger than my blog and much more powerful that anything I can do on my own.


DISCLOSURES

Abbott Diabetes Care covered all my costs to attend #Dx2Melbourne, and provided all attendees with two FreeStyle Libre sensors and, if requested, a scanner. There was no expectation from Abbott that I would write about the event or any of their products, and everything I do write about it is my opinion, in my own words, and in no way reflects those of Abbott – or anyone else, for that matter.

One of my bookmarked pages is this:

This is a public page and lists all open consultations from the Australian Government Department of Health.

I know. I live the exciting life.

I have it marked and check the page regularly to see if there are any consultations that are of interest to me and on which I would like to comment. The consultations I respond to are not necessarily diabetes-related, but then, my health is not always diabetes-related…

At the moment, however, there is a very diabetes-related consultation underway and I would encourage anyone affected by diabetes to take a few moments to fill in the survey.

The Department of Health is currently evaluating the FreeStyle Libre, specifically to consider whether it is suitable for subsidisation under the NDSS. (The consultation is happening following a submission to the Department for subsidisation of the product.)

An Assessment Panel will be set up to consider the submission, but before they meet, the Department is seeking comments from consumers and other stakeholders about the product.

You can take part by completely a very short survey. You need to provide some personal details (name, address, phone number and email address). There is one comment box for thoughts for the Assessment Panel to consider. You are asked to think about how diabetes impacts your quality of life; if you’ve used the Freestyle Libre, did it improve your diabetes management; what are your personal experience of using the device and any benefits or negative affects you may have noted; If you’ve not used the device, what would you expect it to do if you did. You are also asked to write about other devices and tools you use to manage diabetes and think about how they benefit your management.

Some things to consider when filling in the consultation survey:

  • Be honest about your experiences. You don’t have to have used the Libre to complete the survey. This is for anyone who is affected by diabetes and would like to weigh in on whether or not they believe the product should be subsidised.
  • Stay on topic! This is about Freestyle Libre, so it’s not really the time to say that you want a fully-funded artificial pancreas delivered to your door now please. (And just further to that, it’s not the time to lobby for the expansion of the NDSS CGM Initiative. Comments that are not relevant to the issue at hand usually get ignored. Stay.On.Topic.)
  • Try to use really clear language and don’t assume the person reading what you have written knows a great deal about diabetes. It’s likely that the Assessment Panel will include people who do know a great deal about diabetes, but the people from the Department conducting the initial consultation may not. So, don’t use abbreviations and acronyms, or jargon and diabetes slang.
  • This is the opportunity for people with diabetes to have their say. Health professionals are also invited to participate in the consultation, but obviously, their perspective is going to be very different to someone who is actually wearing the device to help manage their diabetes. What you have to say can’t be found in glossy brochures or opinions of those working with diabetes. Use the opportunity to really share your thoughts.
  • So, your experience about actually wearing the device, the accuracy of it, how it has changed your diabetes management (if at all), why you do or don’t like it, the devices convenience (or lack thereof), the best and worst aspects of it are really, really valuable.

The consultation is open until 17 July and can be accessed via this link. Please share with anyone you think may be interested.

DISCLOSURES

None! I’m sharing this information because I know a lot of people who are interested in this device and because many are frustrated at how expensive it is. 

Back from the ADA conference after whirlwind few days in San Diego which basically involved 19-hour days sandwiched between the first day (and 8-hour meeting) and the final day (a couple of short meetings before heading to the airport to fly home). Unsurprisingly, I slept most of the way home.

There were some absolute standouts of the meeting and here they are in super quick dot points. Some I’ll write about in more detail when I’ve finished hugging my family and infusing Melbourne coffee back into my exhausted body.

PR Fail

The ADA’s PR machine needs attention after the completely misjudged way they dealt with objections to their misplaced and archaic ‘photo ban’. It became the story of the first few days of the meeting and they really will need to reconsider what they do next year. (More on this another time, but here is a good summary from Medscape.)

Innovation away from the conference

While the conference is always full of late-breaking research and an exhibition hall of diabetes technology, the satellite events are often where the real innovation is at! On Friday afternoon, I went to the Diabetes Mine DData-Exchange event and was lucky to see and hear some of the latest and most innovative tech advances happening in diabetes, including lots in the DIY/#WeAreNotWaiting world.

Mostly, the room was full of those who knew what was going on in this space, so there really were only a few people who were surprised that there are many walking around with their own DIY kits, (which always makes me chuckle, especially if it’s a HCP having their mind blown by something PWD have known about and been doing for a while…)

(A bit of a watch this space from me as I am about to embark on my own build, which is slightly terrifying. The only thing giving me any confidence is that I have these two Wonder Women to call on if (when) I am completely lost!)

Wonder Women! Dana Lewis and Melissa Lee and their magical machines.

More at #Ddata17

Life for a Child

The IDF Life for a Child update, annually held at the start of the meeting, was, in equal measure, enlightening and despairing.

In this video, hear from Life for a Child Education Director, Angie Middlehurst, who recently visited the Diabetes Association of Sri Lanka and met some young people benefitting from the Program.

If you would like to consider helping Life for a Child, it costs only $1 per day to provide full diabetes care for a child. That’s right, one dollar a day. If you can, please do donate.

 

With Life for a Child’s Education Director, Angie and Health Systems Reform Specialist, Emma.

 

Who has a meeting at 5.30am?

Anyone who believes these meetings are junkets would reconsider the first time they need to be dressed, coherent, communicative and respectable for a 5.30 session. That’s 5.30am. And on the Saturday morning of the conference, I found myself in a room with a lot of other people (also foolishly awake at that time), to listen to the latest in CGM studies.

Thankfully, the session was super interesting with a lot of very valuable information being shared. (I really would have been pissed if I got up and it was a waste of time…)

Dr Steven Edelman from TCOYD was, as always, enlightening and added a most important ‘personal touch’ as he shared some of his own experiences of CGM. And some brilliantly relevant sound bites to remind the audience that while they may be focused on the machines and the algorithms and the clinical outcomes, this is about people living with diabetes.

Trying to tweet everything Dr Steven Edelman was saying…

Diabetes Hands Foundation wake

The news about the closure of the Diabetes Hands Foundation, and the move of its forums to Beyond Type 1 was met with sadness, but also a lot of optimism. Innovators in the online community, DHF was the first online diabetes network I ever felt a part of. It spoke to me, but mostly, it was inclusive. That’s what happens when you have people like Manny Hernandez, and later Melissa Lee, at the helm, and a team around you of people like Mila, Corrina, Emily and Mike.

DHF founder, Manny Hernandez.

We farewelled the DHF at a wake in a bar on 5th Ave in San Diego on Saturday evening and the love and gratitude for DHF was overwhelming. Melissa asked us to recall DHF’s Word in Your Hand campaign as a tribute to Manny and DHF.

My word on my hand… We can always use more of this.

I’m honoured to have been a part of it.

Language

Oh yeah, there was a language session at #2017ADA and I have PLENTY to say about it. Maybe next week….

Sex, Insulin and Rock ‘n’ Roll

The team from Insulet threw an event on Sunday night way up in the sky, overlooking Petco Ballpark, home to the San Diego Padres, and we were presented with a panel of diabetes advocates prepared to talk about anything and everything. Brilliant in the way it was candid, unashamedly open and, possibly for some, confronting. Well done to the panel members who really were prepared to answer every question with personal insight and experience. This format really should be rolled-out as widely as possible to as many people as possible to help breakdown any embarrassment, or idea that there are taboo topics in diabetes.

Children with Diabetes

I was lucky enough to be invited to attend the annual CWD-ISPAD dinner on Monday night and speak with a number of healthcare professionals working to improve the lives of children living with diabetes.

Jeff Hitchcock, founder of CWD, is a personal friend now. I guess that’s what happens after you attend a Friends for Life conference and are welcomed into the family. FFL Orlando is taking palce in three weeks and my family’s time at FFL remains one of the most overwhelming and positive experiences of my life with diabetes.

I caught up with Jeff a few times throughout the conference to speak about the organisation’s work. He gave me a CWD medallion, which is now firmly wedged in my wallet as a reminder of not only my FFL experience, but also value of Children with Diabetes.

diaTribe

I could complain about my 19-hour days, but then I think about Kelly Close from diaTribe and then feel sheepish for even suggesting that I’m working hard! On the final night of the conference, diaTribe hosted three events and I attended the later two: Musings Under the Moon and Musings After Hours.

These events bring together leaders in diabetes technology and innovation and digital health and offer an opportunity to ask questions and challenge (and be challenged!) in a far less formal situation that the official ADA conference. For me, this is where I learn the most as the speakers are prompted by hosts Kelly and Adam Browne to really reflect on where we are going in diabetes innovation. My only misgiving about these events is that there are not enough people attending. That’s not to say that the spaces were not packed to the brim – they absolutely were. But I do wonder if  perhaps it’s the people who really need to hear the realities of diabetes technology are not in the room…

MedAngel

I meet Amin from MedAngel as part of my time with the European Roche Blogger Group. Amin has created an easy-to-use sensor and app to help people with diabetes ensure insulin is kept at the right temperature. More about this another day, but in the meantime (after I’ve been using my sensor for a while), you can read about it here.

Learning all about MedAngel, with Amin.

Take aways

ADA is a very large conference. There is a lot going on, there are a lot of people around and I always leave with a lot to think about. Over the next few days…weeks…I’ll start to gain some clarity about a lot of what I saw, heard and learnt. It’s always the way after a big meeting like this one.

Someone asked me if I enjoyed the meeting and I suggested that was probably the wrong word to use. It was very worthwhile. I learnt plenty. I was able to catch up with advocates in the space who continue to push boundaries and lead the way in insisting that all work in the diabetes space is ‘person-centred’. People with diabetes are expected at this conference and seeing us as just being there – rather than having to fight for our place – inspires me to keep working better and harder.

Disclosures

I attended the ADA Scientific Sessions as part of my role at Diabetes Australia who covered my expenses, except for my first two nights’ accommodation which were covered by the International Diabetes Foundation so I could participate in meetings for the World Diabetes Congress where I am Deputy Lead for the Living with Diabetes Stream. 

It’s day two of the eighth annual #DBlogWeek, created by Karen from Bittersweet Diabetes. This is the sixth year I’ve taken part and it’s a great opportunity to not only write about some truly interesting topics, but also a chance to read some blogs you may not otherwise.  Make sure you check out the list for today’s posts here.

Today’s prompt: Insulin and other diabetes medications and supplies can be costly.  In the US, insurance status and age (as in Medicare eligibility) can impact both the cost and coverage.  So today, let’s discuss how cost impacts our diabetes care.  Do you have advice to share?  For those outside the US, is cost a concern?  Are there other factors such as accessibility or education that cause barriers to your diabetes care?  

Diabetes is an expensive condition with which to coexist. Every now and then, I tally my annual diabetes expenses, at which point, the reason for my frequent flyer status at the pharmacy becomes more than apparent. Between insulin, insulin pump consumables and blood glucose strips, it doesn’t take long for the costs to add up.

Then I add the fees to see diabetes-related HCPs. I choose to see all my HCPs privately, so there is a gap (out of pocket) cost for all these appointments. Fortunately, pathology is bulk-billed, so I don’t pay to have my A1c checked or for any other blood work.

Private health insurance (PHI) is a significant cost each year. We pay about $450 per month to cover the whole family for top hospital and extras cover. PHI means that every four years, the full cost of my insulin pump replacement is covered, and it also means a choice of doctors if we’re in hospital, subsidised stays at a private hospital, and we claim optical, dental and orthodontic each year, plus other things as well.

I wear CGM every day of the year, which adds about $4,000 per year to the tally.

It’s a lot of money. Without factoring in incidentals such as hypo treatments and other things that just seem to come up, my out-of-pocket expenses for diabetes (excluding health insurance) would be about $6,500 per year.

And yet, I feel oddly fortunate, because there are few surprises – or changes – each year when it comes to my medical expenses. I know how it will all play out in the family budget each year.

I know the prices that I pay for all my diabetes expenses are pretty much set, and that means I can plan for them.

I know that every time I walk into the pharmacy to fill an insulin prescription, I will hand over $38.80 for five 10ml vials of insulin. We are never at the mercy of Big Pharma’s arbitrary price hikes. (Last week’s announcement from Lilly of a 7.8 per cent increase on the cost of Humalog – after years of substantial increases – has left me reeling and astonished at how my American friends can afford to just survive with diabetes, let alone live or thrive…)

I know that my diabetes consumables will be the same price every time I order them thanks to the NDSS. The National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) is celebrating 30 years this year – that’s 30 years of subsidised diabetes supplies for all people living with diabetes.

I know how much my doctor will charge me and I know the Medicare rebate. And I know that if I was unable to afford to see my doctors at their private offices, I’d have access to the free diabetes clinic at the tertiary hospital less than 10 minutes from my home, and a bulk billing GP of my choice.

I know that if I couldn’t afford private health insurance, my ability to buy insulin, diabetes supplies or see healthcare professionals would not be affected.

I know that there is no time that I will need to ration insulin doses. I know there will be no time that I cannot afford to see a doctor. I know my pharmacy will always be able to provide me with the supplies I need to live with diabetes and drive the devices I use to manage as best I can. I know I am not really limited by maximum rebate amounts or that if I need more BGL strips, I can get them.

And I also know – and acknowledge – the privilege that allows me to afford health insurance that pays for my insulin pump, and to self-fund CGM, and to see the endocrinologist of my choice privately.

I know there are many other Australians with diabetes who are not as fortunate.

The outcomes for Indigenous Australians are worse – far worse. Poorer Australians have poorer health outcomes. People living in remote areas often struggle to access decent, timely and appropriate healthcare. Australians from CALD backgrounds may not understand a new diagnosis or the treatment being prescribed which affects how they manage their health.

Our system here in Australia is not perfect and we should be continually striving to do better. But it is certainly better than in a lot of other places. The thing about diabetes is that, as many of us wrote yesterday, we are wrangling a health condition that likes surprising us. We often feel we are fighting our own bodies. We shouldn’t need to fight to afford our care – and our health – as well.

The cards that cover my diabetes – and other health – needs. (Oh – and a credit card for all the out-of-pocket expenses…)

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