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My favourite answer to give when someone asks me how I went at any diabetes-related medical appointment is ‘Nothing to report.’ I love being able to say that things are boring. If there is ever a time in my life that I want to be unexceptional and routine, it is when I am hearing or sharing news about my diabetes.

For as long as I live with diabetes, I want to forever be told ‘It’s nothing,’ or ‘There’s nothing.’ I want there to be nothing there when my eyes are screened; nothing to report when I have my kidney function checked; nothing new, nothing scary, nothing to worry about.

The thing is: to get to nothing, we put in a lot of effort. We push ourselves and do things over and over and over and over. Because we’re told if we do all the things, all the time, nothing will happen.

But sometimes, despite all that effort, it’s not nothing; it’s something.

We have done everything possible – everything we possibly can – and we walk in and expect to hear another nothing. But instead, this time we’re told there’s something and we can’t help but wonder why we didn’t do more.

That’s just how diabetes works. There is no rhyme or reason. There is nothing fair about it. But we keep doing it – whatever we can manage at that particular moment.

And we ask and hope for nothing – absolutely nothing – in return. Except our health.

Which, as it turns out, is absolutely everything.

Hoping for nothing.

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More musings from ADA, this time following yesterday’s diabetes-related complications session.

DISCLOSURES

I am attending ADA as part of my role at Diabetes Australia. My economy flights and accommodation have been covered by the organisation.

Dr Jen Gunter* is a brilliant OB/GYN in the US, and she seems to have to spend a lot of time dispelling myths created by looney wellness gurus and Gwyneth Paltrow about things that help women’s health – most of which seem to involve shoving things up one’s vagina. Their non-science approach has included suggestions of inserting jade eggs, glitter and (most recently) garlic cloves in the vagina for all sorts of weird and not-so-wonderful purposes.

So, the good doctor writes blog posts and Twitter threads about why sticking ground up wasp nests (I’m serious) inside our vagina is a very, very bad idea. (I know – that should be self-explanatory. Alas, for some in this world, it is not.)

We get to do this in the diabetes world too. While I’m yet to see anyone suggesting inserting household items, bulbs or crushed up stinging insect homes into our orifices as a potential cure, there certainly are other myths that seem to regularly come our way and have people wondering if maybe, just maybe, they would work better than insulin.

They will not.

Cinnamon will not cure diabetes. I even have a little n=1 study to prove this. I ate nothing but cinnamon buns for two weeks while in Copenhagen and Stockholm and my diabetes did not disappear.

Okra water may have improved the glucose levels of pregnant rats (in one study), but it will not work as a substitute for insulin, so don’t load your pump up with it.

And while I can honestly say I have no interest whatsoever in any of the klusterfuck of Kardashians (I just created that collective noun for them), as soon as one of them trespasses into my diabetes world, you bet they become fair game and on my radar. This little gem from Khloe gets a regular show in diabetes presentations I give:

Myths and misconceptions everywhere! We may laugh about them, and share silly memes, but sometimes, they do more than just cause us to roll our eyes. Sometimes they can be a little more damaging.

Hello Easter, and hello myth that low A1c guarantees zero complications.

The reason this was getting a run was because Easter for many means chocolate, and chocolate is like kryptonite for some low-carbers. Out came their claims that carbs are a one-way street to Complicationsville.

Diabetes-related complications don’t work in a logical, or especially fair, way. There is no formula that you can go to that works it out for you and is accurate every single time. Much like there is no pie for low-carbers, there is no Pi for diabetes.

It would be great if there was. I would love something that worked like this all the time:

A1c <5% = 0 complications ever, ever, ever.

Alas, it doesn’t work that way.

Diabetes-related complications are fucked up for many reasons. Before we even get them, they can be terrifying. We live with this fear hanging over our heads and for some of us, that terror can be horrid.

They come with all sorts of blame and shame and judgement and finger pointing, plus a good measure of guilt. Isn’t that fun?

There are other factors at play that contribute to the development of diabetes-related complications. And we don’t know what they all are. That’s why we see examples of two people running the same A1c for the same number of years yet one has complications and the other doesn’t.

And then, if we are diagnosed with them, we need to readjust our lives to work around this new reality that can be debilitating. And that’s just the physical side of it – the psychological side adds a whole other level.

There is evidence to show that an in-range A1c lowers the risk of developing diabetes-related complications. We have that information and it is regularly and repeatedly banged into our heads. One of the first acronyms I learnt when diagnosed with diabetes (literally day 1) was DCCT!

I know that the idea of developing diabetes-related complications after ‘doing everything right’ and living with a super low A1c doesn’t seem fair. I also know that people are terrified about what diabetes may hold, so gripping onto a promise that the bad stuff won’t happen can be reassuring. We all want reassurance. We all want hope.

But a reduced risk does not equal no risk. Diabetes doesn’t work in absolutes. And people who think that it does are, quite simply, wrong. I really wish they would stop spreading myths about it. (That goes for you too, Khloe.)

*Dr Jen Gunter has written a book and it’s due out later this year. I’ve pre-ordered and you can too here. It’s called The Vagina Bible, or as it has become known in our place thanks to the fourteen-year-old kidlet’s wordplay: ‘The Vible’).

I regularly say that I wish I had an assistant to take care of all the diabetes admin. I’d like to be able to hand over all the scheduling, paperwork and the general keeping track if it all that takes time, brain power and forces us to find room that those not living with diabetes can dedicate to making sure they remember if there is milk in the fridge or when the new season of The Good Place starts.

It would be a thankless job, and I doubt that anyone would be interested in doing it, but I can dream.

A couple of weeks ago, Diabetes Australia officially launched KeepSight, the first ever national eye screening program for people living with diabetes. It’s actually a super easy concept: PWD register to be part of KeepSight and then receive reminders when it is time to have an eye check. No more needing to remember the last time you had a check-up.

This is similar to the cervical screen program that has been around for a number of years now. I have relied on reminders from that program to alert me when it is time to make an appointment for a screening check. KeepSight will help us keep track of our eye checks.

I could give stats about the number of people who are missing out on regular eye checks, and even more stats about rates of diabetes-related eye complications. But I won’t. Because that is not what is getting me excited about this program.

I’m excited because this is one of those simple ideas that goes towards making our lives with diabetes easier. And, quite frankly, there’s not enough of that happening!

Click on the link below; it takes literally two minutes to register.

Now, if we could just find a way for insulin scripts to never run out, diabetes supplies to be endlessly replenished when running low and all our other appointments sorted, we’d be halfway to making this condition just a tiny but easier to manage.

Disclosure

I work for Diabetes Australia, but I am not writing about this because I have been asked to. I am doing it because I genuinely think this is a program that goes towards helping those of us living with diabetes and I will always share anything that does that.

But you do need to be aware of who pays my salary each week and consider my bias when I share things by my employer. You have a right to know that, which is why I will always make sure that it’s clear – each and every time I write about anything in which I am involved. Transparency is important.

Back in February, the BMJ published a piece The Grumpy Pumper and I wrote about why language matters when talking about diabetes-related complications. After we submitted the piece, the team at BMJ we were working with asked if we would like to record a podcast to accompany our article. Of course we said yes, because we both like the sound of our own voices. Plus, we figured that we should jump at any opportunity to talk about this subject.

And so, last month while in Europe, we teed up a time and had a fantastic chat with BMJ Patient Editor, Emma Cartwright. Have a listen to us talking about our own experiences of being told about complications, and how the work we’ve been doing has been received in the diabetes community and more broadly.

Thanks so much to the BMJ for having us on this podcast and talking about this important issue. (And thanks to Emma and Duncan for being so patient and accommodating as we wrangled builders who were – it seemed – drilling into the wall right next to where we had organised to do the recording. We may or may not have bribed people to stop drilling for forty minutes so we could get the recording done!)

 

Last week, the BMJ published a piece I wrote with the Grumpy Pumper. It was part of their ‘What Your Patient is Thinking’ series which includes stories from people sharing their experiences of living with a variety of health conditions, or using health services.

We wrote about the intersection between language and diabetes-related complications and why language matters so much any time this topic is raised. This is our latest piece on the issue (read the PLAID Journal article here, and something we wrote for diaTribe here). We may appear to be one trick ponies, but it seems the appetite for this issue has not in any way diminished – which is good, because there’s lots more to come! (We’re not one trick ponies – I for one can talk for hours about why the fax machine should be made extinct in healthcare.)

It’s been fascinating – and a little overwhelming – to read the responses to the article after it was shared on a variety of social media platforms at the end of last week, and then again over the weekend. It’s also been heartbreaking when people have told stories about how HCPs have spoken about diabetes-related complications in ways that have had negative effects.

It’s refreshing to see many HCPs (including those from outside the diabetes world) sharing and commenting on the article. Much of what we have written is applicable beyond diabetes. It doesn’t matter what health condition someone is diagnosed with; everyone wants to be treated with kindness and compassion and to not be blamed or shamed.

A couple of HCPs have said that after they read the article, they will now consider changing the way the speak. I love this piece from a CDE in the US who said that she honestly thought the words she was using when discussing diabetes-related complications were reassuring until she read our perspective, and now understands that there are better ways to frame the conversation. We only hope that this will lead to PWD feeling less judged and more supported, and not afraid to talk about what is still a taboo topic for so many.

The diabetes and language landscape is broad. I know that there are many who roll their eyes and say that actually, language doesn’t matter, and perhaps we should be focusing on more pressing issues, but I wonder if they are perhaps focussing on issues that they don’t think are really important.

But there is a lot more to this issue than, for example, the debate between being called ‘a person with diabetes’ or ‘diabetic’ – or if it even matters. Regardless of what the specific issue is, we are hoping is that people understand that words really do matter; they have far-reaching consequences; they determine how people feel about their diabetes; and that the right words have the potential to make people feel better equipped to manage their diabetes as best they possibly can.

Please read the BMJ article – it is freely accessibly – and share it with your networks. If you have diabetes, take a copy to your next HCP appointment and leave it for them to read. The way that we make real, sustainable change is to keep pressing a point, and explain why it is important. Hopefully this piece has gone some way to doing that.

The illustration that was commissioned for the print version of the article. Artist Rose Lloyd did such a great job of getting across the messages in the article!

It’s hot in Melbourne today and it’s going to get warmer over the next few days. I’m loving the bone-warming sun that just makes everything look so sparkly and bright. So, I’m spending as much time as possible soaking up the rays (and adding to the ridiculous tan mark around my Dex), because the cooler weather will be here before I know it. I’m trying to build up those vitamin D stores to last me for when winter hits here and I’m reliant on quick trips to the northern hemisphere for work to see the sunshine and warmer temperatures.

Anyway, diabetes doesn’t take a break over the summer. Or winter. Which means, there is always lots to read and see about it. Here are some of the things I’m catching up on now.

Hospital life in pictures

This piece from the guardian will break your heart. Explained pictorially, it’s easy to see that the medical system is broken, medical education is broken, hospitals can be incredibly cold and anxiety inducing places, doctors are at breaking point. And patients in the system are left to deal with the fallout from the disarray.

IDF comps

The International Diabetes Federation is working to reduce the stigma association with diabetes-related complications, with a focus on how the language used can make people feel judged and stigmatised. Last year, they launched the #DiabetesComplicationsTalk Facebook page, encouraging people with diabetes to share stories and support each other.

It’s really great to see the IDF in the #LanguageMatters space, encouraging people to openly speak about diabetes-related complications to help reduce the stigma associated with them. More here.

Diabetes Voice

Still on news from the IDF, the organisation’s quarterly magazine is now available electronically. The first edition is an absolute cracker. Start with this incredibly powerful piece from editor, Elizabeth Snouffer, about diabetes-related stigma. Read it. Share it.

Patient Revolution

If you’ve not checked out the Patient Revolution website, now is a great time to have a look.

Start with this page, which is a library of stories you can click through, finding any specific topics that you are interested in.

Also, there is a Patient Revolution chat which uses the hashtag #WhyWeRevolt. To keep up to date with their chats, and to take part, follow @PatientRev on Twitter.

1,200 mason jars

Do you ever find yourself in the midst of a Twitter thread, wishing, in equal measure, that you hadn’t started, but can’t get enough of it? Sometimes these threads are diabetes-related; sometimes they’re not. Go here for one that is definitely not.

I have spent far too much time in the last week invested in this bizarre tale. There is a lot to take away from the whole saga – maybe starting with: don’t pay USD$169 to hear someone ‘teach’ you how to ‘be you’. And there are a lot of unanswered questions, such as what the hell is going to happen to the mason jars.

Happy reading. (You may need a drink …)

Diabetes in the US

I will never understand the US health system. My head and heart hurt as I hear the struggles of friends with diabetes, and the difficulties they have accessing insulin, and diabetes tech and supplies.

This piece from the New York Times talks about non-medical switching, where insurance companies decide which drugs (and devices) they will cover and subsidise. In Australia, the government decides which drugs will be listed on the PBS (Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme). If a drug is on there, it is the same price for everyone who has a prescription. There are some drugs that require a special prescription to be provided at the subsidised price. But there is no extra negotiating or pleading, or any involvement, with insurance companies.

In a system that is broken beyond measure, this seems like one more roadblock to make just surviving with a condition such as diabetes impossible.

Going beyond

Beyond Type 1 has grown to include a new platform for people with type 2 diabetes. Check it out!

Real life Loop stories

The team at diaTribe has a new series of personal stories of people who have been using DIYAPS solutions. Adam Brown’s story was first, and Kelly Close has now offered her experiences. Such a great idea to get a number of different insights into what has worked, what hasn’t and hopes for the future of DIYAPS.

Sharing and caring

Also from diaTribe, this great piece from Kerri Sparling which provides her own and others’ perspectives on sharing of CGM data. There is no one way to share data – it is personal, individual and can change over time, depending on circumstances. Some choose to; others don’t. I love this piece because it is balanced and offers some interesting thoughts.

Ascensia and CGM

More tech choices for people with diabetes is always great to hear, so Ascensia’s recent announcement of their move into the CGM market has been met with enthusiasm from the community. Read their release here and Diabetes Mine’s take on the announcement here.

SoMe at conferences

I believe social media engagement and use at all health conferences is a critical and necessary part of any communication strategy. There is no better, easier or more effective way to share details of the conference that by encouraging the people attending to broadcast using their own social media networks.

This article explores that, referencing the ridiculous photo ban at ADA in 2017 (which thankfully was changed in 2018).

Menopause and T1D blog

Sarah Gatward is a blogger from the UK and she is writing a series sharing her experiences of living type 1 diabetes and going through menopause. Yes! And thank you, Sarah. Start here.

NDSS reminder

Now is a good a time as any to make sure your NDSS details are up to date. Remember – the NDSS is not just about subsidised diabetes supplies. It also provides information and support for people affected by diabetes.

Go here to make sure your registration details are correct.

Bin the fax

All my dreams came true when I read this article in the Limbic today! Finally calls to get rid of the archaic fax machine in health care. Halle-bloody-lujah!

 

I’m still playing catch up on the goings on at EASD. It was such a busy conference – in general and for me personally – that my head is still lost in a lot of what happened and what I saw. It’s somewhat frustrating for me because diabetes conferences are seen as an opportunity for so many meetings of different groups and projects I’m involved in, and that means I don’t get to anywhere near the number of sessions I would like to. When I can, I make sure I live tweet my way through (that’s how I take notes to do write ups later), but this conference was so busy that there was very limited time for that.

But I still did get to see a lot thanks to the satellite events I was invited to and asked to speak at. Plus, this year at EASD, I was involved in something new that was super exciting.

DZD meets #DEDOC was a novel session combining young researchers and (not necessarily young) people with diabetes to give different perspectives on a variety of current research programs. The event was presented by Deutsches Zentrum für Diabetesforschung.

(My  very limited German (i.e. I sang in St Matthew’s Passionat University – badly – and was in the orchestra for a German-language version of Threepenny Opera, or rather, Die Dreigroschenoper) is apparently good enough to translate that as the Diabetes Centre for Diabetes Research – so, I guess I’m almost bi-lingual now.)

Bastian Hauck hosted the event and was involved in the project to nominate PWD to speak at the event, and encourage other PWD who were at EASD to come along and listen. This was Bastian doing what he does best – facilitate discussion and encourage engagement by different stakeholders. He always manages to ask questions that get people thinking in different ways and did a stellar job again in this event.

The session was not designed as an excuse for PWD to be critical of the research and researchers, or to find fault in what they were doing. It was not to query the merits of the research either. It was to give the researchers an opportunity to speak about their work (in a rapid fire, five minute pitch), and for PWD to engage in that discussion, asking questions and explaining the relevance of the research to actually living with diabetes. While the project may not have actually come directly from PWD, it was a true collaboration where researchers spoke of what drives them, and we shared what we hope from science.

So, what research was on show?

Firstly, we had Dr Stefan Kabisch speaking about research which compared dietary prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes with two different interventions: one low carb and one low fat. Cathy van de Mortelewas the PWD involved in this segment of the session,  and we couldn’t help but have a little giggle that she had been selected. Those who know Cathy know she is anincredible baker and cook. Her creations are magical and if I lived in Belgium, I would be at her place for dinner three nights a week. But low carb and low fat? Not so much! However, she did give a really useful perspective on the need to remember that different eating plans need to be sustainable and what works for one person may not work for another.

Secondly, Dr Carolin Danielspoke about her research in type 1 diabetes prevention vaccines. Dr Katarina Braune stepped in as the PWD (she is also a researcher and endo) to give her comments on the research. It was interesting hearing Katarina, because she comes from the perspective of a scientist as well as a PWD, so her considerations were different to other PWD who spoke. Her questions and comments incorporated the scientific as much as the ‘real life’, and I loved the way she was able to so succinctly and eloquently translate it all so it made sense to someone like me without a scientific bone in my body!

And finally, Dr Julia Szendrödispoke about diabetes-related complications. While the research was specifically about the mechanisms in the development of complications, as well as looking at potential interventions, I was invited to be the PWD in this discussion to lend my language focus. I highlighted how conversations about diabetes-related complications need to be without judgement and stigma, and that at all times, remember that although a single body part may be in question when speaking about a specific complication, it is attached to a person with a whole body and mind that must also be considered.

To be honest, I felt that my comments were almost redundant because Julia did such a beautiful job in her five minute explanation of her work of ensuring that there was no blaming or shaming. I thanked her for this because the language in pretty much every other discussion of complications I had seen that week was not all that palatable!

I love the idea of including PWD to shape diabetes research. And I loved the discussion at EASD. It was an excellent example of how to include PWD in discussions – even highly scientific discussions. And just how easily it can be done!

This event was the first one, but hopefully the organisers have seen the value of conversation-based sessions including different stakeholders. It would be great for events such as this to attract even more attendees – researchers, HCPs and PWD – although a huge thanks to the German PWD contingent who was there, flying the advocate flag and supporting us – and to see them on the main program of the conference.

DISCLOSURE

I was invited to provide my perspective at the DZD meets #DEDOC presented by Deutsches Zentrum für Diabetesforschung. I did not receive any payment to speak at the session. Thanks to Bastian Hauck from DEDOC (the German Diabetes Online Community) for involving me!

Roche Diabetes Care (Global) covered my (economy) travel and accommodation costs to attend their #DiabetesMeetup Blogger event at #EASD2018 and present at their media event the day before EASD. Roche Diabetes Care also assisted with providing me press registration to attend all areas of the EASD meeting.

I’m heading to Sydney this morning (it’s early…too early) for the Australasian Diabetes Advancements and Technologies Summit – ADATS, (follow along at #ADATS2018), which had me thinking about the conference last year where I spoke about Loop, scared a shitload of HCPs, was almost traumatised into never speaking again in public (almost – didn’t happen) and was happy to be branded non-compliant.

Today will be a far gentler experience – my role is as a member of the organising committee, and as a session chair. Surely no one will want to sue me for that. Right?

As I ponder that, and reminisce about last year’s talk, here are some links. So many links that I have been wanting to share. So, have a cuppa, have a read, and share stuff.

Also, being deliberately non-compliant is kind of fun…

(Disclosure first: My flights from Melbourne to Sydney are being covered by the National Association of Diabetes Centres (NADC), the organisers of ADATS. I am on the organising committee for the conference.)

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Finally DIYAPS makes it to the mainstream media in Aus

I’d heard of The Saturday Paper, (which was a surprise to the journalist who interviewed me), but apparently not all that many people have. It’s a weekly newspaper (somewhat unimaginatively named – it’s a paper and comes out each Saturday) with long-form articles. One of those articles was about DIYAPS and came about after journalist Michele Tyde heard about the Diabetes Australia DIYAPS Position Statement.

Read the article here.

Read the DIYAPS Position Statement here.

The body part is connected to the PWD

‘Talking about the “diabetic foot,” the “diabetic kidney,” or the “diabetic eye” suggests they are somehow separate from the person whose body actually hosts the diabetes. This language suggests the diabetes-complicated body part is more like a malfunctioning car part that needs service – if only we could be provided with a courtesy foot, eye, or kidney to use until our own is better!’

The language at ADA this year (all the way back in June…all the way over in Orlando) didn’t really set off too many alarm bells. Until we had a good look at the program. I wrote this piece with The Grumpy Pumper for diaTribe about how it seems that #LanguageMatters a whole load less when talking about diabetes-related complications…and that needs to change.

Conference blogs

It’s great to see the Ascensia Diabetes Care team continue to support diabetes bloggers by inviting them to write up their thoughts on diabetes conferences. The latest contribution is from Sascha Stiefeling (who blogs at Sugar Tweaks) where he gives some insights into the start of EASD. (It was written in German and translated into English.)

Oh – and here’s the post I wrote for them about the Australasian Diabetes Congress a couple of months ago. (I was not paid to write this, or supported by Ascensia to attend, but I did work with them on their Social Media Summit.) 

No weakness at all

On Mental Health Awareness Day this year, UK writer and poet David Gilbert wrote this beautiful post about the strength – not weakness – of living with mental illness.

How we are wrong about obesity

This piece about obesity is a must read. It talks about how weight bias from healthcare professionals and stigma often results in higher weight people avoiding going to the doctor because they fear discrimination, not being believed and being shamed.

More on weight stigma

And read this piece (also on diaTribe) about how weight stigma hurts people and affects health outcomes.

Keep Sight

This week, Diabetes Australia officially launched the first ever national eye screening program, Keep Sight. The program will make it easier for Aussies with diabetes to get their eyes checked. You can read about the program here (from when it was announced back in July).

Disclosure: I work at Diabetes Australia, but was not asked to write about this program. I’m doing so because it is important.

Your story is important

True champion of listening to ‘the patient’, Marie Ennis-O’Connor wrote this wonderful piece about the power of storytelling in healthcare.

Always be kind

I’m always fascinated to read stories from HCPs who write about their experiences on the other side of healthcare. Moving from care-giver to the one needing care can be life-changing. In this BMJ Opinion piece, health researcher Maria Kristiansen writes about how important compassion and kindness from healthcare professionals were for her and her family during her young son’s illness and death.

More on kindness (because we can never have enough)

The first sentence of this article in BMJ by Dr John Launer had me hooked: ‘I’m not a clever doctor, but I’m a kind one’. Have a read.

Diabetes in hospital

I know I’m not the only one to be terrified of needing to go into hospital, worrying about a lack of knowledge about type 1 diabetes treatment and my technology, and having to fight to maintain ownership of my own diabetes care. Adam Brown at diaTribe has written about his recent trip to A&E, surgery and subsequent recovery after his appendix ruptured. Lots of great tips for anyone who may wind up in hospital.

Digital diabetes

How can digital medicine and research, and artificial intelligence transform diabetes? That’s the question research scientist in diabetes, Dr Guy Fagherazzi, asks in his (open source) review in Science Direct that you can read here.

Bake these!

And finally…It’s nearly the weekend and if you have a spare 20 minutes, you really, really should think about baking these! They are crackled parcels of molasses, spice and all things nice and are, quite possibly, one of the best things I’ve ever baked.

I’ve been thinking a lot about motivation recently; specifically, how we remain motivated living with a lifelong health condition that places so many demands upon us. It’s something I also get asked about a lot by others with diabetes – often people newly diagnosed: ‘How do you stay so motivated.’

It’s all smoke and mirrors, because the truth of the matter is that most days, my motivation to ‘do diabetes’ is very low. In fact, I think that there is a spectrum of motivation where zero is ‘What diabetes?’ and ten is ‘I log everything…EVERYTHING…ask me how many carbs I ate yesterday and what my BGL was at 3.10pm and 5.55pm. Go on…do it. Because I can tell you. Do it. Ask me. And also, yes! I can tell you why my glucose levels spiked at 10.12am three months ago on a random Tuesday. Also, look at this: it shows how my glucose levels are impacted by the phases of the moon. In other news…here’s my last fifteen years of A1cs displayed pictorially, but I can also demonstrate them using interpretative dance if you would like me to. Would you? You would, right? Let me just find my Kate Bush playlist on my iPhone…

Generally, I’m a solid 3.5. I don’t do graphs, I have a vague idea of what my CGM is telling me now-ish, and I can tell you my A1c to within about 0.5 per cent. I call this winning.

I have had periods – extended periods – where I am far closer to zero, which have not been great because that has added ‘not-doing-diabetes-guilt’ to the simple ‘not-doing-diabetes’ which basically equalled feeling crappy all around. And I’ve also been closer to ten – this, for me, was called ‘pregnancy’ – and I was borderline obsessive.

Someone recently asked me if I thought there was a secret to staying motivated. I don’t think there is, because surely, at least one oversharing blogger would have written about it by now.

But I do believe there are small factors that, when combined, do make it easier to remain, if not enthused, at least stirred to keep chugging along with diabetes.

Firstly, in range numbers beget in range numbers, and in range numbers make us want to check for more in range numbers more frequently. It’s undeniable that when we see numbers that don’t cause the response of rage, frustration, sadness, stress or anxiety, we are more inclined to check again. And again.

Technology that helps rather than hinders makes everyone feel better. Many think that it’s a given that new tech makes life easier, but unfortunately, that’s not always the truth, because often – at least to begin with – it requires more input from the user. Actually needing to do more, but not necessarily seeing results is not a recipe for remaining enthused!

Boring tasks are boring, so any way that we can eliminate them or reduce them helps. Making appointments to see our HCPs, finding time to visit a pathology centre for quarterly A1cs (and more) and keeping our diabetes supplies and meds current all take physical time as well as mental time. I have a pharmacist who is like my personal assistant when it comes to reminding me that it’s probably time to reorder insulin and NDSS products and prompts me when I need a new insulin prescription and I cannot tell you how much I love her. She sends me texts messages (totally unobtrusive) and I reply by text and then a day or two later pop in and she has everything ready for me. I can’t remember the last time I ran out of something, thanks to Mae!

But for me, if there was a silver bullet, it would be this: I am motivated because of today. Today, I have been able to do everything I have wanted to do and diabetes has not stopped me, even momentarily. And that makes me want to do it more.

I know that a large part of that is that I have the capacity, the will and the ability to do what I need to make this happen. I speak from a position of privilege, because I also know that the devices I am using – and am able to afford to use – certainly do help me with everything. They have helped to make my diabetes today doable, manageable, and as untroublesome as diabetes can be.

You can threaten me with what is going to happen in five, ten, twenty years’ time; you can tell me about all the disabling and debilitating complications that will happen if I don’t remain motivated and how they will impact on my life as a fifty, sixty and seventy year old.

But unless what you are saying is going to impact on me right here, right now, I can ignore it, and I can ignore the things that may help me reduce the risk of those things happening.

Perhaps that’s where public health messages about diabetes get it wrong. They tend to focus on longer term impacts. It’s not just teenagers who believe they are invincible. Despite a body that each and every day looks less like that of a sprightly youth, I think I am still young. I think all the things that are considered long-term issues are still years off. Being unmotivated doesn’t seem to matter when I don’t need to deal with those issues today.

But when diabetes does impact on my day now, then I notice. More hypos, more hypers, more interrupted sleep, more roller coaster numbers, more exhaustion, more feeling crappy. All of these things make day to day life more difficult. And I want to avoid them as much as I can.

I’m quite pleased with my solid 3.5. Sure, it could be better. Sure I could do more. But it’s consistent. And it’s achievable. Plus, quite frankly, everyone around me should be pleased with the absence of interpretive dance.

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