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Spending time surrounded by diabetes can be overwhelming and that is never more so than at a conference like ADA. It is huge – there are thousands and thousands of people, an exhibition hall with stands from device and pharma companies that messages about diabetes that are all tied up in statistics and words (and not really about people), and for every talk that shares hope and promise, others that focus on despair.

But it’s easy to step away from that – even if just for a moment – and turn to a member of your tribe. Because then…

…not once did I feel despair.

…not once did anyone pass judgement about another’s diabetes.

…not once did anyone make me feel afraid.

…not once did anyone attribute blame or shame.

…not once was anyone expected to explain themselves.

…not once did I feel stigma.

…not once were the words spoken anything other than real and authentic.

…not once did someone ask another person about their glucose level or A1c.

…not once did someone suggest that anything to do with diabetes was someone’s fault.

…not once did I feel overwhelmed or overcome.

…not once did someone make me feel that I was not enough.

…not once did someone look at another PWD to suggest that they were failing.

…not once was fear used as a motivator.

…not once were we made to feel sorry for ourselves.

…not once did my life feel like it should be measured in nothing more than numbers.

…not once did we call each other inspirational for just living with diabetes.

…not once did anyone do anything other than cheer another’s efforts.

…not once did anyone overreact if they noticed another PWD was low.

…not one did I feel that I was a burden.

…not once did I feel that I had to be a superhero.

…not once did I feel alone.

…not once did anyone demand that their way of doing diabetes was the better way.

…not once was diabetes the overall focus.

There are times that diabetes does its best to make me feel a burden, or that I am simply not enough. But not once – not ever – when I am around people like this do I feel anything other than whole.

Find your tribe

Find your tribe…

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Whoa – fast jet lag and iced coffee-fuelled talking….

DISCLOSURES

I am attending ADA as part of my role at Diabetes Australia. My economy flights and accommodation have been covered by the organisation.

As a parent, I learnt there is this magical thing that happens when you are in a really crowded and noisy place with your kid/s. Somehow, over the roar of the crowd, you can always hear your kid if they are calling out to you. It’s some sort of sorcery that blocks out the din, and allows your kid’s annoying angelic voice to still be heard.

That kind of happened to me the other day when I was sitting in a café minding my own business, working away and savouring the always excellent coffee at my favourite local. There was a table nearby that seemed to be made up of a mum, twin two or three-year-olds and grandparents. They were talking loudly, the kids were playing and talking over each other. They were a little rowdy, but it made no difference to me. If you want to work in a café, you have to be prepared for the noise! I wasn’t listening to their conversation – I was focussed on what I was writing. I couldn’t tell you what was being said.

Until I heard the word ‘diabetes’ through the racket, clear as a bell. I looked up, to hear the rest of what the mum was saying ‘…and it’s like a sensor you wear – I think on the back of your hand – and you just run something over it and you get your result. I want to try it so I can stop having to prick my fingers.’

I have had a statistically significant number of diabetes in the wild encounters recently. It looked like I was about to add another one to the tally.

‘Hi,’ I said. ‘I have diabetes. I also am a diabetes advocate. I think you’re talking about the Freestyle Libre. It’s a small sensor that you wear on your upper arm, and you scan your smart phone or other reader device over it to see what your glucose level is. I wear a continuous glucose monitor. That transmits my glucose readings to an app on my phone. It’s different, but kind of the same in that it limits having to prick your fingers.’

We chatted for a bit and then a friend joined me. She was actually wearing a Libre sensor, so (after ordering her coffee) she did a quick show and tell to so the woman could see how it worked. (For the record, not all my friends have diabetes. This was a fluke!)

I passed on my contact details to the woman and encouraged her to reach out and get in touch for a chat. Because that’s what we do. That’s how this community works.

I’ve been thinking about our diabetes community a lot recently. After being in Manila (please read my disclosures on this post), I have felt that strong pull towards people who gather strength from each other because of our shared experience.

One of the sessions in Manila addressed some community initiatives that have really relied on that community spirit, and we talked about why they work. Grumps and I led the sessions and discussed Spare a Rose, #TheLowdown2019, and #TalkAboutComplications. These were examples of different ‘campaigns’ that all had similar results.

Spare a Rose is owned by the diabetes community and it is for the diabetes community. It works because no individuals own it – that’s not how it works. You want to support it, great! Do your thing and get the word out. No one directs what it looks like apart from encouraging others to reach into their pocket to support Life for a Child and save the lives of children living with diabetes.

#TheLowdown2019 is a campaign out of Diabetes Australia (disclosure: I work there), but it isn’t about us. It is us creating a platform for the community to share their stories and come together. What we heard as people shared their hypo experiences was others connecting to those stories.

And #TalkAboutComplications provided an opening statement and ongoing support and encouragement for the community to talk about a topic that is often seen as taboo, and filled with blame and shame.

As I wrote in this piece, the group in Manila was already a community, even if they hadn’t quite started calling themselves that yet. And since then, they have found their voices – loud, passionate, smart voices – and are showing what community does. They support each other; they build each other up; they share what they know.

We use the word ‘community’ a lot in diabetes. We talk about it in terms of face-to-face groups, we talk about it when it comes to meeting others with diabetes and welcoming them into the fold, and we talk about it in terms of our online connections. Some people struggle to find just where they fit in there, but I genuinely believe that there is a place for everyone. You just need to find the tribe that makes sense to you and your perspectives of diabetes.

I have written and read a billion words about why community matters, and how, when it’s right it can be an absolute saviour. When I try to explain the value, it’s easy to get lost in superlatives, and sickly sycophantic gushing that start to sound empty, so I often show this video and throw the hashtag #Simonpalooza at people, making them promise me to look it up and learn about it. Now, I can add the story to what happened in Manila last month.

I became part of a new community when I was in Manila, and those advocates became part of our bigger one. I feel that their experiences add to the diversity and the experiences of the DOC. Their stories start to meld into the fabric of other stories, and I so love that we now get to hear them too.

When those diabetes in the wild moments come my way, I can’t overlook them. I suppose I could have ignored what the woman in the café was saying and let her work it out on her own. But why would I do that? I have benefited from the no-agenda-other-than-wanting-to-connect attitude of many in our diabetes community – honestly, I benefit from it every single day. There is no way that I could do anything other than say ‘hi’. And connect.

(Video of Day 1 of the Manila workshop made by one of the advocates, Kenneth.)

Last Thursday morning, still wracked (and wrecked) with jet lag from having just returned from ten days in Europe, I boarded a flight to Manila. I would be co-facilitating a workshop for people with diabetes from across the Philippines about how advocacy, community and engagement. If I’m completely honest, I had no idea what was in store for me.

I knew that the PWD who would be attending had all been through a diabetes camps program in the Philippines. They were all young and very eager to step up as advocates. They were the reason the workshop was happening – they realised it was time to elevate the PWD voice in advocacy efforts in their country and they wanted some help in doing just that.

And so, the idea of a workshop was conceived, and the two facilitators were flown in from opposite sides of the planet to pull it all together. Enter me and the Grumpy Pumper (who for once had to travel further than me and was more jet lagged than me).

As the facilitators, we were there to talk about some examples of effective grass roots advocacy, talk about how engagement with other stakeholders is important, and highlight just why the voice of those living with diabetes is critical when it comes to lobbying. We had an vague outline of just how we thought the workshop would run, but we really wanted to ensure that the attendees could shape it the way they wanted, asking relevant questions and walking away with information that would help them.

Once the workshop started, it was very, very quickly apparent that we already had a thriving, dynamic and enthusiastic community in the room. They just weren’t seeing themselves that way. Over the course of the workshop, we saw the ten PWD realise that their own stories and voices are important and have real currency, and they are an unstoppable force when they came together. If ever I needed a reminder of the power of community, I’d have found it there in that room in Manila!

There will be a lot more about the weekend workshop in coming days. I’m still getting my head around it all and am not really sure what to write just yet. It may take me some time. What I do know is that the DOC now has some new voices. Their perspectives will be different to those we often hear about, and that diversity is always good in a community.

So, while I’m getting my words together, get to know these amazing young advocates. They’re on Facebook here; Twitter here; and Instagram here.

 

DISCLOSURES

Novo Nordisk covered costs for the advocacy workshop. Grumps and I were invited to facilitate the workshop as part of our involvement in the Novo Nordisk DEEP Program. Novo covered by flights, accommodation and ground transfers.

I’m back on deck at work today after a whirlwind ten days in Europe for meetings and a conference. I started in Amsterdam, then flew to Florence and finally flew to Copenhagen (via Pisa). Those ten days were busy, long and interesting. And, perhaps best of all, packed full of others from the diabetes community.

Spending time with others living with or around diabetes is restorative. I know I get jaded at times, and burnout – in all its forms – takes its toll. I’ve been feeling a little advocacy burnout lately, and that has the tendency to make me feel that I need to step away from diabetes for a bit. Plus, I wasn’t sure if I could be bothered with the inevitable onslaught that comes when these sorts of activities happen.

Instead of hiding away (which is what I half wanted to do), I got on a crowded plane to Europe to spend almost two weeks ‘doing’ diabetes advocacy in different forms. By the time I got to Nijmegen – an hour and a half out of Amsterdam – for HypoRESOLVE I was already feeling better. I felt the darkness of burnout slip away as I sat in meetings, speaking up and providing PWD input into the project. And there, alongside me, were others living with diabetes. We leaned into each other, stepped back so another could take their turn, and supported each other to feel comfortable and relaxed. We reminded each other that there was a reason we were there – because people with diabetes must have a seat at the table and that we must be heard. We lived, breathed and ate ‘Nothing about us without us’ throughout that meeting and by the time I boarded a hideously early flight to Florence for the next meeting, I was raring to go – further boosted by a diabetes in the wild encounter.

Two days of meeting in Florence with friends and peers from the diabetes community talking about our experiences in the diabetes community continued to see my mojo return. We spoke about difficult topics, how the community works best and the place everyone has in there. I was reminded that the community ebbs and flows, and that it is not static. Sometimes, that rut that I find myself in means I forget that all communities change and grow and develop. This is actually a positive, because as it shifts, more people come in, some people step away (for good or just a bit), we reconfigure how it fits us, and diabetes makes sense in new ways.

Some much needed downtime meant that I could reconnect with peers and feel myself being completely and utterly filled up in a way that only comes when surrounded by people who get diabetes and this weird diabetes space. We don’t all have diabetes – we represent different corners of the community, but we know diabetes in a way that is particular to those who live close to or with it. Our dinner after the second day of the meeting saw us finally able to breathe and take some time out of diabetes speak, and instead revert to a steady flow of laughs (shrieks, actually).

The next day, a friend from Italy just happened to be in Florence. We met up and I met her family, including her son who has diabetes. As we drank coffee just over the Ponte Vecchio, diabetes was spoken about a bit, but mostly, I got to learn about this young man who is clearly going to take on the world. He is smart, funny, delightful and inquisitive. His questions about Loop were intelligent – far more so than anything I would have thought to ask before I started using the tech! I hugged his mum as we said good bye, noting that she had just introduced someone else to our tribe.

By the time I arrived in Copenhagen (at 2.30am thanks to high winds in Florence, a bus ride to Pisa to take a diverted flight and some first-rate Italian disorganisation), I was exhausted, but at the same time felt more enthusiastic about the diabetes space than I had in some time. The next morning when I arrived at the conference venue, I was ready for a packed day of speakers, and to do my own presentation in the afternoon. I looked around and saw that there were a number of people living with and around diabetes that I knew, as well as a whole lot of new faces in there. The event was for HCPs, but as always, those of us with a truly personal connection to diabetes searched each other out. I met members of a support group known as ‘Diabetes Dads’ who meet regularly to speak about their kids with diabetes. They were there to support their friend who was speaking about his Looping son.

At lunch, I sat at a table with two PWD I knew. Two other people joined us and we quickly found out they too have type 1 diabetes. The conversation flowed – we understood each other, and our shorthand of diabetes speak easily fitted into our stories. We nodded as we heard stories that sounded familiar, even though they were being told by someone from another country who, until we sat down with our overflowing lunch plates, we had never met before. One of the women at the table had asked during an earlier session about how to wear the devices required for Loop, and I pulled out my RileyLink and showed it to her. She held it and weighed it in her hands. She’d wanted to know how to wear it with a fitted dress and I was able to show just how easily I could tuck away everything, even with the straight dress I was wearing for the day.

We may have all been there because of an interest or curiosity in DIY diabetes, but there is far more than that to draw us together. Just like as at the earlier meetings. As always, diabetes brings us together, but it’s far more that keeps us that way.

By the time I boarded the Dreamliner at Heathrow, all traces of burnout, and questions about how to manage in the sometimes tricky maze of diabetes community had completely subsided and were replaced with the reminder that when we find out tribe and surround ourselves with them, the burnout is replaced by feeling supported. And that’s how and why we show up. We do what we do, we show up, we speak up and we try to get stuff done. Ten days of that and I feel so much better. Which is good. Because as it turns out, those ten days are just the start …

DISCLOSURES

My flights to Amsterdam and accommodation while in the Netherlands was covered by HypoRESOLVE. I am on the Patient Advisory Committee for this project. My flight to Florence and two nights’ accommodation were covered by Lilly. I was in Florence for a DOCLab Advisory Meeting. My accommodation in, and flight home from Copenhagen was covered by the Danish Diabetes Academy. The Academy invited me to speak at their Diabetes DIY Movement conference.

I like your phone case.

I looked up from my laptop and over at the woman sitting next to me in the crowded Qantas Business Lounge.

Oh. Thank you!’ I said to her. We were sitting at one of the high desks, both charging different devices before our flights.

‘I could do with one of those,’ she said to me. ‘I don’t like the word non-compliant, but to be deliberately compliant sounds like a lot of fun. Where did you get the case?’

A friend designed it for me and started to sell it on his online shop after I spoke at a conference for healthcare professionals. I’m with you on not liking the word. I’m a diabetes advocate and to me, non-compliant is a dirty word.’

I saw the woman sit up a little straighter. ‘You have diabetes?’ she asked.

‘Yep. I’ve had type 1 for twenty-one years.’

‘My daughter was diagnosed three years ago. She’s eighteen now. She just started at Uni this year. She’s doing really well.’

I smiled. ‘That’s great to hear. What is she studying?’

Music. She’s a singer.’ There was undeniable pride in  her voice. Now it was my turn to sit up a little straighter.

‘Really? I did too. I was a classically trained flute player in a former life, studying at Melbourne Uni. I don’t play anymore, but I certainly loved it at the time. I thought it was going to be my forever ‘thing’. Then I kind of got side-tracked!’

We sat there and chatted more about music and having daughters and watching them grow up. We talked about raising strong and challenging girls, reminding each other that it was good that they were like that, even though we wished they would challenge others more than their own mothers! She told me about her job which takes her all over the world and we compared notes on coping with too much long-haul travel and far too much time away from our families. We complained about coffee in airports and on planes and how ridiculous our first world problems are. She asked me a little about my job and how long I had been doing it. Our conversation was peppered with expletives and laughter.

I heard my flight being called and started gathering all my things, tucking them back into my overstuffed bag.

‘Lovely to chat with you,’ I said as I stood up to leave. ‘Good luck to your daughter with her music studies.’ I began to walk away, but quickly turned back. ‘Oh, and her diabetes, too.’

‘I can’t wait to tell her that I met someone who has diabetes and studied music.’ She paused for a second. ‘I think she’ll be happier when I tell her that we hardly spoke about diabetes though. She hates it when that is all people ask about her.’ 

‘She is so much more than diabetes. We all are. And there are far more interesting things about those of us with messed up beta cells. She sounds like an absolute gem, ready to take on the world.’

I walked to the gate and as I was boarding my flight, I noticed the woman in front of me had a Libre sensor stuck to her arm. And that she was wearing the most fabulous red, high-heeled boots. I smiled to myself. So much more than diabetes.

I have some illuminating discussions with healthcare professionals. After I’ve had an in-depth conversation, I find myself going over things they have told me and discover that I have always learnt something new about what it means to work in a system that is, in many ways, broken. I learn how their approach to healthcare changes year by year as they try to do their best for the people they see each day. And I realise that I never, ever could do their job.

Other times, I shake my head a little because I wonder how their understanding of the day-to-day challenges of living with a chronic health condition is so far removed from reality. In these cases it’s almost as though we are speaking different languages.

Recently I spoke to a group of HCPs about those differences. I focused on how we manage to fit diabetes into our busy lives in ways that HCPs never can imagine and how the neat text book description of life with diabetes is very different from the mess that we are trying to tame each day. I spoke about how what they say can be read in a multitude of different ways by those of us on the other side of the consultation, and to think about words carefully. And I spoke about how although some education of HCPs about diabetes suggests that there is a one size that somehow fits us all, the truth is that we require our education to take into consideration every size and shape possible and for it to be delivered accordingly.

A doctor came up to me afterwards and thanked me for my talk. ‘Thanks for making me think differently about some things,’ she said. I loved that she said that, and I told her so. ‘Actually, that’s always one thing that I hope to get when I hear someone speak about diabetes – a new perspective or way of thinking about something that I think I have all worked out.’

We chatted a little about what she’d heard that had surprised her and would she would now be thinking about in other ways. I may have high fived her when she said that she would now be taking a lot more care with the language that she uses. ‘I had no idea that what I was saying had such stigma attached. I honestly thought I was saying the right things. I never meant for people to feel blamed, but I can see now how I could have come across that way.’

That’s been one of the challenges of the #LanguageMatters movement in diabetes. As we’ve tried to bring HCPs along for the ride, we’ve had to do it in a way that doesn’t make it sound like we are berating them. I do and will continue to call out language that impacts on PWD negatively because it does matter. Language has the power to make us feel like we can take on diabetes or be defeated by it; it can make us feel like we are doing all we can and that is enough, or that we are failing and will never do enough. Again, for those down the back – language does matter. But I truly have never believed that HCPs use language with any malice or intent of harm. It’s often just because they repeat the words and phrases that have always been used.

I explained this to the doctor and we spoke about how to get the message across in a way that highlights and promotes collaboration. After we’d been speaking for about 10 minutes, she said ‘I have a question for you,’ I nodded, eager to hear what she wanted to ask. ‘What’s the best kept secret in diabetes?’

I was startled. What an interesting – and frankly brilliant – question. I’d never been asked that before and I wanted to think about it a lot. Poor woman – I’m sure that she just wanted some sort of quippy response and to be done with it so we could go home and eat dinner.

‘Wow!’ I started, excitedly. ‘I love this. Are there any secrets to diabetes?’ I started a checklist, going through some ideas.  ‘Is it peer support? For some reason, a lot of people don’t know just how widely available this is. Or maybe it’s how people can drive their own healthcare by setting the agenda. I frequently have people tell me that they just do what their doctor tells them (or rather, say they will) because they didn’t realise that healthcare could be an open and joint dialogue. In diabetes, maybe it’s all the clandestine DIY stuff that is going on which is so apparent to those of us who play on Facebook and Twitter, but maybe not to those who are not online as much. I know it’s NOT cinnamon. Actually – maybe it’s the whole thing about how when living with diabetes, or other chronic condition, our mental health is rarely taken into account, so perhaps understanding that and being referred to relevant services is the secret. It happens to so few of us…’

I stopped, because I could sense that there was so much I wanted to say, but I truly didn’t have an answer. ‘I don’t really know,’ I sighed. ‘I wish I did. I wish there was one…’

We said our good byes and I started to walk away before the doctor called after me: ‘You know what the best kept secret in diabetes is?’

I spun around. ‘What?’ I asked. I admit that I was hoping for a key that was going to unlock the mysteries of diabetes and suddenly make it a lot easier to live with.

‘You,’ she said. ‘And others like you. If only doctors like me took the time to listen to you all we would know a lot more and probably do a much better job.’

I smiled at her. ‘We’re not really a secret,’ I said. ‘We’re actually quite out there. You’re just not looking in the right places. Or asking the right questions.’

I gave her a little wave and left the room.

This post marks one thousand posts here on Diabetogenic*. That’s a lot of senseless rambling, ragey-moments, times celebrating and despairing about diabetes, and links to brilliant ideas and post… or to things that have either amused, frustrated, delighted or annoyed me.

A thousand posts in and diabetes is still a constant in my life (damn it). And I remain not good at diabetes…and I have many of those thousand posts to prove it.

There are clearly some recurring themes that I write about. I say that I am a one trick pony, but perhaps that’s not completely true. I seem to have a few tricks up my sleeve, really. And now I’m confused, because ponies don’t usually have sleeves and my metaphors are very, very mixed.

Here are the things that seem to have taken up a lot of writing time and words over these thousand posts…


Peer support

Most of the time, I am pretty positive about living with diabetes. Let me be clear: that doesn’t mean I love it, or even like it. But I feel that generally, I know where it belongs in my life and it seems to fit in that place as well and happily (begrudgingly) as it can.

I know that one of the reasons that I feel this way is people in the diabetes world I am lucky enough to call friends and peers. Online friends, in real life friends and those who cross both boundaries are a critical part of my living-well-with-diabetes strategy. Knowing that there are only a very few places around the world where I couldn’t find someone from this community to have a coffee/tea/prosecco/mojito with gives me an incredible sense of comfort. (And reassurance in case of diabetes emergency…)

I say that my peers with diabetes help me make sense of my own diabetes and that’s true. Knowing people who understand innately what it is like to share a body with diabetes means that I never feel alone. Diabetes is so isolating at times – even for those of us surrounded by great people who support and encourage us. As much as I need those people and am grateful for them, it is others living with diabetes that help me realise that I am never, ever alone in dealing with the ‘diabetes things’.

The diabetes online community is made up of lots of people and not all have diabetes. We each bring our own experience and perspective to it. I’ve learnt so much from those living arounddiabetes and how they incorporate it into life, because it comes with its own set of challenges and victories. That is why the community is so valuable – its diversity and range of experiences and perspectives.

I regularly talk about the value of community and diabetes peers and finding our tribe. It can take time to settle into just who and what that looks like, and it changes because there are always new people around. But it is so worth it. My tribe? I love them so hard.

Nothing about us without us

I am not the tattooing type but if I was, I think that I would have this phrase inked on my body somewhere (or maybe I’d be really pretentious, and have it written in Latin: Nihil de nobis sine nobis, according to Google translate.) It remains a frustration of mine that this isn’t the starting point for pretty much anything and everything to do with diabetes care. The fact that we still need to fight for a seat at the table – or a ticket to a diabetes conference – is, quite simply, not good enough. Having others speak for us, on our behalf thinking they know what we need, is offensive.  It should never be the case that non-PWD voices speak for us or over us. Ever. Our stories are powerful, but they are ours and we should have the platform to tell them in our own way; in our own voice.  Tokenism is rife and sometimes, that frustrates me even more than when we are completely excluded. The delusion of inclusion is, I think, worse.  Whilst there may have been some strides made to true co-design and inclusion, we have not come far enough and until we get this write, I’ll have a lot of content fodder for this blog.

Food

I like food. I write about it a lot. And I want to be Nigella. That’s really all I have to say about it right now…

Waffles in Brussels. Both were excellent.

More than numbers

Apparently, stating the obvious is still necessary in diabetes. We are more than numbers; our A1c does not define us; our worth is not wrapped up in our glucose levels. We have been saying these things for years…decades…and yet there are still times that this is what we are reduced to.

New treatments, devices, drugs, education programs are measured in reduction of A1c. Perhaps this is because it can be measured, but talk about only getting part of the story. I can’t help but think that if PWD were part of establishing research protocols, there may be far more than numbers to assess the success of a treatment or therapy. (See also: nothing about us without us…)

Women’s health

In recent years I’ve written about the issues specific to women, health, sex and diabetes a number of times because there is so little out there about it. And it seems it resonated with a number of women who wrote to tell me (and the HCP who saw me in the fresh produce section at my local Woolies and yelled how she loved my idea of giving lube in diabetes event bags).

Anyway…talking about the stuff that may not be the easiest is important. It’s the only way we get remove stigma and encourage people to share their stories. Which helps others. That’s why I have openly written and spoken about miscarriages and infertility. And eating disorders. (I know – not an exclusively women’s health issue.) There is nothing shameful or embarrassing about these topics. Other than we don’t speak about them enough.

Learning from and supporting others

The Interweb Jumbles I write are my favourite (and cheat’s) way of pulling together all the things I’ve seen that have interested me and leaving them in future place for (my) future reference. Plus, I love sharing what others in the diabetes community and world are doing.

I have always benefited from the generosity of others in this community who have shared my work and I pay that back whenever and wherever I can. Supporting each other is critical.

There’s so much going on in the diabetes world all the time and I highlight the things that resonate because I think that if they mean something to me, they may mean something to someone else, too.

Science. Science. Science

From pseudo-science rubbish, to ridiculous made-up diabetes cures to anti-vax delusions. How much writing material have they provided!

I live in hope that one day – and may that day be soon – we won’t still have to read about these charlatans trying to convince us that all that ails us can be cured with fairy dust and positive thought, or that vaccines are evil and cause diabetes, or that ‘wellness warriors’ are the true experts and professionals when it comes to diabetes.

While a lot of what I write is spent mocking these fools, there is an underlying seriousness to it all. Who can forget little Aiden Fenton who died after his parents stopped giving him insulin, instead leaving him to be treated by a ‘slap therapist’?

Anyone who is sprouting any treatment that is not based in science when it comes to diabetes or perpetuating anti-vax rubbish is as barbaric as the man who was charged with Aiden’s death.

The whole person

Diabetes happens because of something not working properly with our pancreas. But it affects every single part of us – something that astoundingly still seems to surprise some people.

Considering our mental health and emotional wellbeing is critical when assessing just how diabetes impacts on our every day. For some, diabetes seeps into every single part of us and for others, we keep it at bay and manage around us. For most of us, there is an ebb and flow of just how that works.

And while we’re talking about the whole person, diabetes-related complications may be specific to a particular body part, but those body parts remain connected to the rest of us.

For so long, we get metaphorically chopped up with as only bits of us get attention and focus. But nothing in diabetes is ever in isolation. That’s just not how it works.

And finally, language

The trick this (however-many-trick) pony is most known for is #LangaugeMatters and you know what, I’m happy to wear that. I really am. If I was to stop this blog today (thought about it…1,000 has a nice rounding off feel to it), and never spoke about diabetes ever again (oh, if only), I would not be disappointed if this was what people thought of when they thought of me and this blog.

Language matters. It does and I refuse to, for a moment, believe that it doesn’t. I am certainly not the only person playing in this space and I am so grateful to have a tribe of language matters peers and colleagues can rise above the small details to understand just why this issue does really matter.

___________

Thanks to everyone who has read one or more of these thousand posts. Thanks especially to the people who keep coming back. I can’t promise that there are going to be a thousand more posts. And I can’t promise that I will learn any new tricks other than the ones that I seem to have on repeat at times. These issues remain important to me and perhaps to you too.

* At EASD, my mate Bastian Hauck gave me a head’s up that I was getting close to publishing the 1,000 post on this blog. I’d not have had a clue otherwise. Thanks, Bastian!

I’ve been working for diabetes organisations now for coming up to eighteen years and unsurprisingly have accumulated some truly fascinating things along the way.

Including a photocopy of a 1972 edition of ‘Victory’, the ‘Official publication of the Victorian Diabetic Association’ (now known as Diabetes Victoria).

I was flicking through it the other day and came across this gem:

Apparently, ‘the wife’ is the reason her husband either becomes overanxious about his diabetes or instead, takes charge and continues his existence as a captain of industry, putting diabetes in its rightful place. That’s right, it is ‘the wife’s’ fault her husband becomes a blithering mess unable to look after himself and incapable of doing more than curling up in his favourite chair, wearing his favourite slippers and cardigan while being (over) parented by his partner. This must be because 1972 wives have some sort of enchantress powers that conquer any man’s autonomy or decision-making abilities.

1972 wives sound magical and awesome. How do I become one?

All joking aside, if we remove all gender references in this piece and have it just about the way in which others treat us and how that influences our view about our diabetes, there is, perhaps, an element of truth to the thinking behind it all.

What I need (and am fortunate to have) is a group people around me to support me as I make decisions and diabetes the way I want and need. They back me by being there with a shoulder to lean on or an ear to listen if I ask, but never take over or try to ‘fix’ things.

This sort of support helps us know that we can do this. I may never think of diabetes as ‘an amusing inconvenience’ (there is little to be amused about a lazy pancreas), but I will never see myself as neurotic or incapable.

I certainly don’t want a 1972 wife (or a 2019 partner, parent, sibling, friend, colleague, healthcare professional, associate or anyone else) dictating how I feel about the health condition that lives in me. I do want them to laugh with me at this ridiculousness, though. And promise me that they will continue to keep being exactly the way they are right now! (And maybe joining me when I tell off anyone who suggests – even for a second – that I inject in the lav adjoining the boardroom.)

Last Friday, I took part in my first Facebook Live chat as part of The Lowdown campaign. (If you’ve not watched the Facebook live chat, you still can by clicking here.) I was joined by former AFL footballer, Jack Fitzpatrick, who has lived with type 1 diabetes for about six years.

Jack and I could not be more different. He speaks a language of sport of which I know barely one or two words. His perspective of the first few years of his life with diabetes are very, very different to mine. He talks about how, thanks to his workplace – and AFL football club – he had a doctor and dietitian working with him every day. He worked out how to fit diabetes into his job with the help of HCPs that most of us see a few times a year at the most.

But there are also similarities. We were both diagnosed as young adults and we had to learn how to manage a very demanding health condition at a time when there is far more fun to be had. On Friday, we spoke about hypos, and his stories made complete and utter sense to me.

The Lowdown campaign is a beautiful story telling initiative. That’s what has happened over the last week – PWD told their stories about hypos and time and time and time again, there were comments from other PWD who recognised that story. We recognised the way our heart might beat faster, or the confusion that heralds plummeting glucose levels. We nodded as we heard about people over-treating, because in the moment, that is all we feel we can, and must, do. We smiled at the silly things we read others do when low, (hello, HypoBoy).

Every time I saw a comment from someone who said a version of ‘That happens to me too!’ I felt tingles. That connection comes only when we feel that we are not alone, that someone understands what we are going through. I get it – it’s why I read diabetes blogs and listen to diabetes podcasts. I’m looking for real life, authentic stories, the lived experience.

As I said in the Facebook live chat, this campaign is a form of peer support. Because that is exactly what is happening – people with diabetes supporting each other, using stories that resonate, make us feel like we part of a tribe, helping us understand that our way of dealing with something is just as legitimate as anyone else’s.

We all do it – we all seek out those that stories mirror our own. That doesn’t mean that we have to think the same way or do the same things or feel the same way. It’s not about there being a one size experience or everyone having the same thoughts and ideas. In fact, the diversity in what we see and read is important because it means that we can find the ones that we connect with most and help us better make sense of our own experience.

Too often, the story of diabetes is told using statistics. That is the way researchers and healthcare professionals and governments talk. But for those of us actually living with diabetes, it will never be about the one in how-ever-many-thousand. We don’t want to hear how the dice is likely to roll or how the numbers keep getting more and more stacked against us the longer we live with this condition. We don’t connect with data, statistics or numbers. We connect with people and to their stories. That’s what we need to tell. And that’s what we need to hear.

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