You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Social media’ category.

There’s lots happening, but I can’t look away from my Loop app at the moment because I’m so damn excited and obsessed! (I’ll be writing something about it sometime this week.)

But if I wasn’t doing that, I’d be (re)reading these things…

Why it costs so much to see a specialist
I’ve always paid to see my endos privately. In fact, I generally ‘go private’ for all my healthcare needs – I can’t remember the last time I was bulk-billed for a medical consultation.

It does cost a lot, and I am grateful I can afford it, but the excessive costs often discourage people from seeking the right care they need. Of course, we do have excellent public health in Australia. My choice for seeing HCPs privately include wanting continuity of care, and not being subject to frequently very long waiting periods.

This piece in The Conversation looks at why specialist care is so expensive. And what can be done to reduce costs.

Lookiee! A diabetes Wookiee!
For those who participate in OzDOC (and other DOC activities) you may have come across David Burren. I met David last week to talk all things tech (actually, I just fired questions at him about Loop and he patiently answered them without rolling his eyes even once). He’s started a diabetes blog all about diabetes and technology and, thankfully, it is in language that even I can understand.

Check out David’s Bionic Wookiee blog here.

Statues are like tumo(u)rs.
With all the nonsense going on in America at the moment, this piece from McSweeney’s most adequately explains why the ridiculous idea that statues commemorating less than favourable moments in history need to remain. Here’s my favourite part:

I view this tumor as an important symbol of your body’s history and heritage. Removing the tumor would be yet another example of misguided medical correctness in today’s liberal America. I protest this surgery and refuse to whitewash your rich medical history. The tumor must be kept prominently displayed inside your body.

Do better, America. We all know you can.

More on what’s on the inside
Mel Seed’s blog about normalising mental healthcare in diabetes follows on from DX2Melbourne and is well worth a read. Read it here. 

Diabetes is just…
This…

Faster insulin coming to Aus
A couple of weeks ago, I shared on my socials the exciting news that ultra-fast insulin, FIASP, had received TGA registration. No actual ‘launch’ date info as yet, although next week is the ADS ADEA Annual Scientific Meeting, so we may hear more then.

And in news that we already know…
Apparently, CGM is not just for abdomens anymore… File under ‘No Shit Sherlock’.

Swear-y
My blog emails keep getting blocked by the profanity filter at my husband’s work. Every now and then, he forwards me the message he’s received which states that the email was not delivered due to ‘offensive language’. #SwearyWife

This Twitter account definitely wouldn’t make it through, but it’s one of the best things I’ve seen on the interwebs for a while. I’d like to print THIS up poster size and put it on the wall of my office/wear it on a t-shirt, but perhaps that’s not appropriate.

D-parents and sharing the scary parts of their child’s diabetes online
I’ve linked to Moira McCarthy’s writing before because I think that she gets it right every single time she writes about the role of parents in their child’s diabetes.

This piece asks parents to consider if sharing their child’s scary and dramatic diabetes stories online is doing more harm than good. (I rather clumsily explored a similar issue last year in this post.)

Read her piece at ASweetLife here.

4Ts on Diabetes Mine…
Last month, during National Diabetes Week, in an endeavour to get our 4Ts message out as widely as possible, the good folks at Diabetes Mine allowed me to write a little about our campaign. You can read that here.

Living and loving someone with diabetes
As much as I think I am the most delightful and easy-to-live-with person in all the world, I have to admit that diabetes can and does impact on all relationships… and makes me perhaps not the most delightful and easy-to-live-with person. Aaron and I chalked up 23 years together yesterday. Diabetes has been part of the equation for over 19 of those years.

Diabetes advocates Nicole Johnson and Lorraine Stiehl have written a new book which has been called a practical guide to loving a person with diabetes. I’ve ordered a copy and will be leaving relevant pages open for my loved ones to read.

You can get a copy of What To Do When Your Partner Has Diabetes: A Survival Guide from Amazon. 

Meme-y and true
There are a lot of diabetes memes out there, but sometimes I see one that just hits the mark so perfectly. Such as this from a TuDiabetes community member:

On Monday and Tuesday of this week, I attended and facilitated Abbott Diabetes Care’s #Dx2Melbourne event which brought together eleven Australian diabetes bloggers. (All my disclosures can be found at the end of this post.)

(Just a recap – the DX (or Diabetes Exchange) series of events have now been run about half a dozen times. Other than #DX2Sydney and this year’s Melbourne events, the others have been held in hard-to-take cities including Stockholm, Berlin and Lisbon and have been attended by bloggers from the UK and Europe.)

#Dx2Melbourne reunited most of the bloggers who attended last year’s event, with some new faces thrown in for good measure. I was introduced to Alana Hearn for the first time, finally got to meet diabetes yoga guru Rachel Zinman, and caught up with Helen Edwards. (All the links to the blogs of the ‘repeat offenders’ who attended #D2Sydney can be found on this post.)

Some may believe that I am naïve in saying this, but the event is not about product. In fact, apart from a 45-minute presentation – the session that kicked off the two days – there was no other discussion about Libre or any other diabetes product unless it was specifically raised by one of the bloggers. Abbott did not have a new product to push; Libre has been out for over 12 months now in Australia.

(I am not, however, naïve enough to think that events like this are not part of the health industry’s 21st century marketing strategy. But, as I said last year when responding to a comment on my blog about this, this is the 21st century marketing. And I’m glad that consumers have a place in this strategy, because it would be far worse if industry was continuing with 20th century marketing strategies which completely excluded people with diabetes, and did not offer us any opportunity to directly engage and work with industry. Any device company NOT doing this is falling way behind and needs to catch up.)

As the Abbott team stated in their welcome, the idea of the DX events is to continue their commitment to bring together people living with diabetes to share ideas. And for Abbott to get an idea of what it is that is important to people with diabetes and what makes us tick – albeit a very select and privileged sample of advocates.

With this in mind, for me, the most valuable part of the event was the discussions that were completely driven by the bloggers. In an open session where we were exploring ‘why we blog’, I listened carefully as everyone articulated their reasons for going online and sharing their stories with strangers.

Reasons varied – some do it because they simply want to tell their story, some because they love to write, some have specific issues within diabetes they want to open up for discussion, some see it as an advocacy platform. What we don’t hear – ever – is anyone saying ‘Because I want to make money doing it’.  I can be all evangelical about it and say it’s because we’re a choir of angels, but mostly I think it’s because we’re smart enough to know the limitations of what it is that we do, as well as understanding the strength is in connecting, not money-making.

We also considered the shortfalls of having an online presence.

I’m an over-sharer and I know that there is a lot I write that many others wouldn’t feel comfortable sharing – and some people have told me that it is sometimes difficult to read. I also write about issues that are of no real concern to others, and they are more than happy to let me know that I’m wasting my time and energy on such irrelevant (language) matters. I also know that as soon as I put something out there, I am opening myself up for comment – both positive and not-so-positive. We had a discussion about how we manage unwanted attention and, in the most extreme cases, trolling.

I have never regretted anything I have written or shared, and have never taken anything down because I’ve felt it was too personal. But I have had some very unwelcome and sometimes nasty comments sent my way.

I found this a really useful, but somewhat challenging, discussion. I have written about some very personal experiences, probably most notably, pregnancy loss. I’ve also written a lot about how diabetes impacts my mental health. These are two topics that are frequently hidden away, surrounded by shame and secrecy – precisely the reason that I am committed to writing about them.

However, the times I’ve been trolled – and fortunately, that hasn’t been often – it has been when I’ve shared very personal stories. They’ve been the times where I have found myself at my most vulnerable, and being so exposed makes any sort of negativity harrowing.

It was reassuring to discuss – and remind each other – that even though we are voluntarily putting ourselves online, we are not inviting people to be nasty and disrespectful. Online is real life, despite what some people may think. This is the space where many of us convene to work together, support each other and share information; it’s not a place for personal attacks.

I left the event on Tuesday feeling utterly exhausted, but also filled to the brim – a feeling that only comes after spending a solid period of time with others treading the blogging and advocacy boards. I was reminded of the similarities as well as the differences we experience living with diabetes. I felt buoyed by the various issues that draw our attention. I felt desperate at the access issues I still hear about – both here in Australia and overseas. But most of all I felt part of something that is much bigger than me, much bigger than my blog and much more powerful that anything I can do on my own.


DISCLOSURES

Abbott Diabetes Care covered all my costs to attend #Dx2Melbourne, and provided all attendees with two FreeStyle Libre sensors and, if requested, a scanner. There was no expectation from Abbott that I would write about the event or any of their products, and everything I do write about it is my opinion, in my own words, and in no way reflects those of Abbott – or anyone else, for that matter.

A lot has already been written about the photo ban at ADA last week. For the first couple of days of the meeting, the first topic of conversation I had with everyone I met was not about what I’d seen or learnt. It was about the photo ban and the ADA’s failure to appropriate deal with the complaints. It was a debacle, an absolute shit storm that could have been addressed in many ways to make it better.

Firstly, it’s worth noting this is not new. Two years ago, I was swiftly reprimanded for tweeting a photo during one of Bill Polonsky’s talks. The ADA bot who was monitoring any flouting of the no photo rules quickly responded to anyone sharing photos on twitter or other social media platforms. The message was strong: stop doing this or your credentials will be revoked. For the record, this was the photo that got me in trouble:

Yes – that photo of Dr House straight from the Internet was the reason that removal of my press credentials was threatened.

This year, execution of the archaic policy was increased to expert level. And people were not happy.

Many were asking why the ADA was being so strident in their enforcement of the policy or, more importantly, why the policy was there in the first place. But it’s not just the ADA. Taking photos or videos during sessions or of posters is banned at the IDF’s WDC, EASD meeting and here in Australia at the ADS-ADEA meeting. (How’s that for a sentence of alphabet soup?)

However, I have never known it to be enforced the way it was last week with a multifaceted approach of vigilant soldiers in red approaching anyone daring to photograph a slide during talks or in the Poster Hall, as well as social media (mostly Twitter) responses being fired left right and centre to anyone who then tweeted a photo.

The ridiculous thing is that anyone at the conference could tweet WORD FOR WORD what the speaker was saying (provided they are a speed Tweeter), but just couldn’t take a photo of the slides. And to be honest, a lot of the speakers were pretty much reciting WORD FOR WORD what was on the slide, so it was possible to pretty much tweet out every single thing being presented. (Also, that makes for a really boring presentation. Don’t do that!)

Suddenly, the story of #2017ADA was not new diabetes research or technology or treatment. In fact, the story wasn’t diabetes at all; it was how pissed off people were at the ridiculous ban.

People trying to follow along from home felt excluded and annoyed. Attendees of the conference felt frustrated that we couldn’t share what we were seeing with those not in the room. As is often the case at these meetings, there were two or three or more concurrent sessions I wanted to attend, but as I’m yet to learn how to be in more than one place at the one time, rely on people in the sessions I’m not at to share what they are seeing and hearing.

And me? I was irritated and exasperated at how difficult it was to follow the #2017ADA Twitter feed because of all the bloody criticism of the photo ban. (And just delicately, those people who commented on EVERY SINGLE TWEET about the ban, you were not helping. You were making it harder.)

I understand that I am very fortunate to attend diabetes conferences both here and overseas and I am conscious that not many people with diabetes are sitting in the audience. I also know – from personal experience as well as anecdotally – the people in the audience are not always the best sharers. When they return from conferences, they don’t sit with people with diabetes to share what they have learnt.

So, as a person with diabetes who likes to share and communicate, I think it’s my responsibility to share as much as I possibly can about what those of us with a registration or press badge are seeing and hearing.

Trying to stop the flow of communication in digital times is ridiculous and it demonstrates an appalling lack of understanding about harnessing digital platforms’ reach to educate, inform and support not only people with diabetes, but also healthcare professionals. It was also ludicrously naïve of the organisation to think that there would not be backlash and that they would get off without condemnation.

The control of information is really not possible in this day and age. A conference about diabetes should not be shut off from people with diabetes, and if the only way ‘in’ for most people is online, then that avenue should be thrown open as broadly as possible.

In two months’ time, the ADS ADEA conference will be in Perth, bringing together diabetes healthcare professionals from across Australia. It is our largest meeting. Currently, on the meeting website, there is this warning in their social media guidelines:

I am calling on the organisers of the ADS-ADEA conference to change this policy immediately, instead, encouraging the sharing of information far and wide. Consider those who cannot afford the time or fee to be at the conference, yet would benefit significantly from learning what is going on. Embrace social media as a way to extend reach from the few thousand attendees (or few hundred in any one session) to a far larger audience. And welcome all diabetes stakeholders to be part of the discussion online.

Just think how much better #2017ADA could have been if that had been the story.

Some excellent commentary on the photo ban at ADA.

Medscape’s piece written while the meeting was happening. 

The always thoughtful Marie Ennis O’Connor’s piece for Medium

And this from Medpage Today

 

Last Friday, I flew to Sydney to take part in the first Australia HealtheVoices Conference coordinated and run by Janssen (disclosure at the end of this post).

I’d followed along the US versions of this event, which have been running now for a couple of years, always with diabetes health advocates attending. So I was thrilled when I received an invitation to take part.

The event was run on Saturday with a dinner on Friday evening featuring Turia Pitt as the keynote speaker. I’m going to write something about that another time. Today I want to focus on some of the actual conference. This is just the first post – the rest will come over the next week or so.

I was extraordinarily excited about being in a room with advocates from outside the diabetes space. (But also pleased for the safety of the diabetes advocate bubble! We were well represented – four of us seated at the same table, occasionally nodding at each other as we recognised the stories others were sharing, even if their health condition was different to the one we navigate.)

Anytime I am surrounded by health advocates (diabetes and other) I have a weird contraction of feelings: surprise and absolute no surprise. Surprise that experiences are so similar and yet absolutely no surprise that our experiences are different! I read this article from the SMH (written as a follow up to the event) and so much resonated about Luke Escombe’s story, despite his peers not living with diabetes.

The speakers at the conference were diverse and covered a lot of different issues. And holding it all together was journalist and TV presenter Shelly Horton, whose fabulousness I cannot even start to describe! As well as making sure everything ran to time, Shelly shared stories of her own health experiences of living with PCOS.

HealtheVoices emcee, Shelly Horton, hamming it up with some diabetes advocates.

We started with Samantha Jockel from Aldi Mum. She was a terrific speaker, however I found that not everything she said sat easily with me, mostly because at times I struggled to see the parallels between what I do (write a rambling little blog about about my own experiences of my health condition) and what Sam is doing (building a community which generates income).

I also realised I’m a crap blogger! As Sam eschewed the benefits of knowing your analytics and stats – she is an analytics ninja! – I realised that I rarely if ever look at the stats on my blog or other social accounts. Facebook sends me a weekly roundup and I categorically ignore the email; Twitter wants me to check the activity of different tweets, but I don’t; Facebook also tells me when I a post is doing better than usual and I get annoyed at the alert thinking that it was someone posting a cute cat meme: LinkedIn tells me how many people are looking at my profile, urging me to go and see who they are, but I’m seldom interested.

I know these are tools that can help me grow my audience and build my following, but I still have this idea that the only people reading are my mum and the guy from Romania who used to message me every day. (Perhaps if I looked at my stats, I’d know that’s not the case…)

Sam also spoke about boosting posts and ‘throwing some money’ at them if they could do better. I’ve never spent a cent on promotion of my blog and can’t see that I ever will. Once I hit publish and share what I have written on my social feeds, I don’t do anything any further. Occasionally I repost the link on Twitter, but only when I remember that there are people living in different hemispheres and were probably asleep when I posted it the first time so may have not seen it.

I guess the difference for me personally is this: My blog is not my job. I make no money from it and I have no intention of it ever becoming a money maker for me. I have a job – this is not it, despite the significant time and energy I spend writing. I blog for very selfish reasons – to find my tribe!

But there was much that did resonate with Sam’s talk and the overarching message that I took away was this: be authentic. As she spoke about the importance of finding our own voice online, she kept coming back to the need to be relatable, honest and real.

That did make sense to me, because I know that the only reason that I write is to tell my story about living with diabetes – the good, the bad, the ugly, the real.  I know that when I read about people living with diabetes, I want to read the genuine experience. The blogs I read – and keep going back to – are the ones that are undoubtedly honest and authentic.  Real life. Real stories. Real people.

DISCLOSURE

Thanks to Janssen (the pharma arm of Johnson and Johnson) for covering my travel and accommodation costs to attend the #HealtheVoicesAU conference. There was no expectation by Janssen that I would write about the event and everything expressed here (and on Twitter Facebook and other social feeds) is mine and mine-alone! To read more, check out the conference hashtag, #HealtheVoicesAU, on the socials. 

Paris was, as always, wonderful. The mild weather, meant it was lovely to walk everywhere. With only three and a half days in one of my favourite cities, I was grateful for the daily 40-minute stroll from the hotel near the Eiffel Tower via the Trocadero to the conference centre so that I at least get to see some of the city.

Even early morning meetings were bearable with views like these. (Hashtag: not photoshopped!)

Sunrise behind the Eiffel Tower.

On my first full day in the city, I attended an event hosted by Roche (all my disclosures are at the end of yesterday’s and today’s posts, as always). The Blogger #DiabetesMeetUp brought together almost 40 bloggers from across Europe. And me.

The day’s activities were a continuation of their event at EASD last year (read about that here), although attendance was expanded to also include a contingent of fabulous women from Italy. It was actually the fourth #DiabetesMeetUp event hosted by Roche with many of the attendees having been to all of them. (There was a comment when I tweeted a photo of the day that the group didn’t look particularly diverse. I’m flagging that here because I acknowledge the privilege in the room. I do think that it is important to ask how better representation can be achieved. The flip side is that the event targets bloggers, so there is already a bias for well-connected and informed people. I have no answers….)  

Just some of the bloggers…

The day was busy and very interesting. I have been an extremely vocal critic of device companies failing to engage with consumers in the early stages of device and software development. It frustrates me no end when I hear of the limited and barely tokenistic engagement undertaken by device companies so Roche’s approach is truly a breath of fresh air.

It was also pleasing that while some of the day was dedicated to showcasing product, there was a lot more than that on the agenda. Plus, all product presentations were an opportunity for the bloggers to provide feedback, plus there was plenty of frank discussion from both attendees and Roche staff.

So, what devices where on show? There was some more about the Roche Insight CGM, mostly about the app that is being developed to accompany the device. When this was discussed at the EASD #Diabetes Meetup last year, there were many suggestions and recommendations about how to improve the app platform. It was utterly brilliant to see a lot of those changes integrated in the new design. Obviously it’s a lot easier to make changes to software rather than hardware, but still this focus on gathering feedback and then making the changes is commendable.

One of the most exciting aspects of the discussion for me was the discussion around the Insight systems alarms, specifically the language being used. Some of the words and phrases were flagged as not being quite right, and there was an opportunity to wordsmith just what language would be used. For example, the term being used was ‘warning system’ and I questioned if that was really the best word available. I think of ‘warnings’ as something connected to inclement weather or danger on the roads, not really ideal when thinking about data I use to help manage a health condition each and every day.

Talking language. It was hard to get the microphone away from me.

The customisation of this system is outstanding. Other than the super-low (safety) alarm, all others are fully customisable, can can be activated for certain times of the day, use different sounds for different alarms for different times and the user can build up to ten daily profiles. The objective for such thorough customisation is to work towards reducing alarm fatigue as well as create a more flexible, individualised and intelligent alarm system

As yet, there is still no integration with the Insight CGM and the Insight pump – a criticism and recommendation from the group back at EASD last year, however I believe this is on the radar. Undoubtedly, the feedback from the group was that this is essential, so I hope that the Roche team find a way to make it happen!

The other product that was (very briefly) discussed was the Senseonics Eversense system – a ninety day implantable CGM sensor and data management system. This tech is currently in trial stage and more information can be found here.

Roche gave all the Blogger #DiabetesMeetUp attendees a press pass to ATTD which meant that throughout the remainder of the conference, there was a significant consumer contingent roaming the halls and sitting in sessions. Considering that this is a group of highly connected, tech-savvy and smart individuals, it was terrific that there was the opportunity to be part of the conference amongst the health professionals.

I’m really grateful to have been offered the opportunity to attend the day – a very big thank you to Ute and the team from Roche for extending an invitation to me (I promise, I am not always the jet lagged mess you see at these events!) and for your ongoing commitment to engaging the community. As well as participating in the agenda set by Roche, I was able to speak to some amazing and activists who each day are advocating for people with diabetes in their own countries. The level or excitement and commitment to what they do simply never wanes.

Disclosures

My flights and accommodation costs to attend the Roche Blogger #DiabetesMeetUp were covered by Roche Diabetes Care (Global). They also provided me with press registration to attend ATTD. My agreement to attend their blogger day did not include any commitment from me, or expectation from them, to write about the day or their products, however I will be sharing my thoughts on the event here. Plus, you can read my live tweets from the event via my Twitter stream.

When I spend time with friends in the US, they often take great delight in the words I use or the way I pronounce things. Apparently, there is much to amuse in the Australian-English language. In New York back in January, when speaking with friends about our voting practices, I explained the concept of the ‘sausage sizzle’. Our friends were looking at each other clearly wondering if we were serious, or completely making things up (i.e. fair dinkum or having a lend of them). It is my aim to have as many of my DOC friends as possible using ‘frocked up’ whenever they speak about dressing a little fancily!

And, somewhat oddly, it is in America that I am (apparently) most difficult to understand. I know I speak very, very fast and the frequent waving of hands can be distracting. I’ve learnt to adapt with some things (spelling my name when ordering coffee, I say ‘zee’ instead of ‘zed’) and try to adapt to the local lexicon (trash instead of rubbish / gas instead of petrol / Waldo instead of Wally* etc.) and try to slow down the speed with which I speak.

It’s February which means one thing and one thing only. It’s a month of red roses. That’s right, it’s time again for Spare a Rose, Save a Child.

I could tell you all about it again, but let me leave it to Manny and Graham who, once they get over the language barrier, do a great job of explaining the whole idea behind Spare a Rose

I make a monthly donation to Life for a Child via this campaign. Each month AUD$6 comes out of my account and directly deposited into theirs. Six bucks. Basically, that’s a coffee and a half. So, the equation is this:


That’s right: for what it costs me to purchase 1.5 coffees, a child in a developing country survives for another month.

Every February, I urge people to consider donating to Spare a Rose Save a Child – either as a one off on Valentine’s day, or to set up making a monthly donation. And this year, with all that is going on in a very messed-up world, here is one small way to feel that you are helping out someone who really, truly needs it.

‘Inshulin’ or ‘inssulin’. It doesn’t matter how you say it. Just help a kid in need get some!

Click here for information about this year’s Spare a Rose Save a Child campaign, including how to donate.

spare a rose

 

*IT’S FREAKING WALLY, NOT WALDO!

Back in 2012 when we were thinking of starting the #OzDOC weekly Twitter chat, Kim, Simon and I were committed to making sure that it was a safe place, welcoming to all who wanted to use it. We encouraged people to actively participate, lurk in the background, jump in and out as they needed.

I had always been so impressed with the non-toxic and inviting place the #DSMA chat was, welcoming people with all types of diabetes as well as a few health care professionals, and I hoped that we could replicate this environment, albeit on a smaller scale, with #OzDOC.

Pleasingly, that’s the way it started and now, it continues to be that way. While I’m no longer involved in the running of OzDOC, or moderating its weekly chats, whenever I do drop by to participate, it is clear that the safe and inclusive model that formed its foundation continues.

It has been great to see that the encouragement of healthcare professionals to join in – lurk at first to get the idea and then respectfully participate – has continued, and frequently, a DNE or dietitian or endo will pop in and contribute.

But last night, during the chat, there was an intrusion that was not respectful. In fact, I likened it to someone bursting, uninvited, into my house and yelling that they didn’t like the way we’d decorated it and then offering to fix it as long as I paid them. I bristled immediately. And felt protective of the people in the #OzDOC room who had been so candidly and honestly sharing their thoughts.

This was a particularly delicate chat. Ashley had more than expertly navigated the sometimes tricky waters of a discussion about the place diabetes fits in our lives, and ended the chat with a question about burn out. It is a testament to the space that is #OzDOC to just how candid and honest people were in their responses.

So, the idea that someone tweeted something about how so many participants were clearly living with ‘out of control’ diabetes and then linked to her fee-for-service website, was not only inappropriate, but also insensitive, thoughtless and showed a true lack of understanding of what people with diabetes are dealing with.

My mother hen instinct kicked in. I had just laid myself bare as I used words that describe burn out to me, and others had as well. This was absolutely not the moment to promote a business and, at the same time, tell people they were doing a crappy job at managing their diabetes. And there is no place for judgement in this chat, especially from someone so clearly out-of-touch.

While my response was somewhat reflexive and probably could have done with a moment away from the keyboard before hitting the ‘tweet’ button, I don’t regret that I did it. And the responses from others in the chat suggested they too were feeling uncomfortable about the intrusion to the discussion.

I was furious that someone had so aggressively and judgementally invaded the safe space that has been so carefully cultivated. ‘Out of control’ diabetes? Really? Fuck off. (Actually, that was the response I wanted to type, but kept myself nice, so maybe I wasn’t as harsh as I thought.)

My concern about this intrusion was twofold. Primarily, I would hate for any person with diabetes to feel afraid of participating in any sort of peer-based activity for fear of being judged. We get enough of that outside of the spaces we create for ourselves and certainly shouldn’t have it forced upon us in our own groups.

But also, I would hate for any HCPs to think that they are not welcome to participate. They most certainly are, however the respect, lack of judgement and kindness expected by participants is expected of everyone. If they are unable to demonstrate that, stay away.

I’m not naming and shaming the person who tweeted last night. The tweet has been removed anyway. But, I would absolutely encourage them to come back next week and the week after and the week after that to learn. Watch what goes on in these chats, listen to what people are saying, understand the real-life sensitivities of diabetes.

And then, feel free to softly, softly join in. Respectfully ask questions (after asking if it is okay to ask questions) if there is something that needs clarifying. Gently share ideas that may be of benefit. But absolutely do not try to sell something. And check your judgement at the door.

no-judgement

One of the discussions at #MayoInOz turned to the divide between personal and public social media use – especially relating to our loved ones. ABC National Medical reporter, Sophie Scott, explained the rules she’s put in place to define her professional and personal life, trying to keep the two distinct to protect her children.

It’s something I frequently think about. I use social media a lot. But despite possibly appearing to be a (social) media whore, I have rules about how I use it when it comes to my family – especially our child. The first photo I posted of her was when she was three years old. She is standing in the front garden of our old house, under the weeping silver birth tree, dressed in one of the fairy dresses that was on frequent rotation at the time. She has a cheeky smile on her face and looks quite delicious. I’ve since posted baby photos of her – usually around her birthday and on the pregnancy diary I recently published.

These days, she gets to veto whether or not I post a photo of her. If she is happy for me to share, I do. If not, I don’t. She often asks who will be able to see the photo before deciding if it is okay for me to share it.

But when she was wee, I had a very easy rule for sharing photos of her. If I wouldn’t share a photo of me doing something, I wouldn’t share a photo of her doing the same thing. So, no photos of her in the bath, naked on the floor on a towel, throwing a tantrum, crying, when she was sick, doing something embarrassing or looking grumpy. I don’t want photos of me in any of those situations online, so how could I justify it as okay for me to post photos of her like that – even if she is a kid?

This isn’t necessarily about me being worried that someone is going to do something nefarious with the photos. It’s about how she’d feel knowing others have seen her like that.

The same goes for sharing stories about her. I would never tell a story that would embarrass her – now or later in life.

The discussion at the conference turned to how parents of children with health conditions and disabilities share photos and stories of their child, perhaps not thinking about the repercussions for their child. I have commented on this in the diabetes world, and been told in no uncertain terms that I don’t get a say in this discussion as my child does not live with diabetes.

I understand that my perspective on diabetes – diagnosed as an adult – is very different to that of a child’s or the child’s family. But I am an adult with diabetes. And when I see a photo of a kid in hospital with tubes coming out of them because they are in DKA, all I can think about is how that child is feeling at that exact moment.

I’ve had a couple of DKA hospital admissions thanks to gastro bugs. I am not being melodramatic when I say that I felt that I was about to die. Between the throwing up, unstoppable nausea, desperate need to quench my thirst, weakness, rapid heart rate and feeling terrified, all I wanted to do was curl up and feel better. Or die. I would be horrified if someone shared photos of me at such a vulnerable time. I don’t want anyone to see me like that – ever.

The same goes for when I am having a weepy hypo, unable to stop the tears or the unintelligible stream of consciousness babbly coming from my mouth…or a giggly hypo where I am borderline hysterical. I don’t want that recorded for all to see. (I once filmed myself having a scary low and when I watched it back a couple of days later, it was truly shocking. I deleted the video, terrified that it would somehow find its way onto YouTube or Facebook – probably posted by me when I was next low!)

When I’ve asked parents of children with diabetes about this, they say that they do it as an awareness-raising opportunity. By showing their kid during the more serious diabetes times, they feel they can give an accurate picture of life with diabetes. It shows the pain and the fear and the relentlessness of it. I understand that – trying to tell the story of diabetes in a way that resonates with those not actually living with it is important. It’s one of the reasons I share my story.

But how do we do that without it seeming almost exploitative – especially if the story or photos we are sharing is actually not directly ours?

I was glad for the discussion at #MayoInOz, because I’ve started several posts about this issue, but have always felt clumsy and as though I am overstepping. I still hear the words ‘You don’t get a say’ and delete whatever I have written for fear I will be chastised and told to step away.

But after the conference, I decided I did want to write about it and, perhaps, start a discussion that points specifically to the diabetes world. Where is the line drawn between showing the world what diabetes is about and exploiting or exposing our loved ones? And who gets to decide? Is consent an issue here? Or is the child’s story inextricably tied up with their parents and therefore there is no line?

Thankfully, someone has written about this in a far more eloquent and elegant way! One of the other scholarship winners at the conference was Carly Findlay. Carly is a well-known blogger, writer, speaker and appearance activist, and this piece she wrote last year is definitely worth reading. (She’s also a genuinely nice person who didn’t even flinch when I once accosted her in Lygon St, almost yelling at how beautiful she looked at her recent wedding because she absolutely did and I just needed to tell her, in a ridiculously excited and animated manner. She was most gracious to this bumbling mess!)

Postscript

I don’t think I have really done this issue justice. I do know that some of my favourite bloggers are parents of kids with diabetes and I think that is possibly because I have never felt uncomfortable about what they have written. While Annie Astle is a very, very, very good friend of mine and my family’s, she is also a brilliant writer and when she shares her family’s story, it is never at the expense of Pumplette’s dignity. (Annie’s own dignity is often given a bashing because she is so bloody self-deprecating!) I recommend her blog to every parent with a newly diagnosed child because her posts are beautiful, honest and never manipulative.

A couple of weeks ago now, I was incredibly fortunate to win a scholarship to attend the Mayo Clinic’s Healthcare and Social Media Summit in Melbourne. I’m a little slow in getting anything out about it, because…well because November. But November is over! And finally, the first of the few posts I’ve started is here and the others are coming. #Tardy

Five scholarships were offered for consumers to attend, and I was encouraged to apply. So, I diligently filled in my application, hitting ‘submit’ moments before the deadline. (Not to self – always have an up-to-date bio available!) And then, the week before the conference, I squealed aloud in a meeting when I received the email, letting me know my application was successful.

The scholarship recipients. (Click photo for source.)

Before the event even started, there was online chatter about making sure the consumer reps in the room connected. Which we did! Before and throughout the conference, calls to ‘find your tribe’ resonated, and I certainly felt I had found mine! It was an absolute delight to meet and an honour to wave the consumer flag alongside Carly, Mel, Liat and Belinda.

And others in the tribe made me realise just how high the bar is set! Lisa Ramshaw, event organiser, is a force of nature. There is no other word for her enthusiasm and dedication to healthcare social media. I suspect Melissa Cadzow has #patientsincluded tattooed on her body somewhere so great is her commitment to the inclusion of consumers in all activities that affect us!

Kim giving her talk

And of course, the five-minute presentation in the innovation showcase from Kim Henshaw about OzDOC presented another strong consumer voice to the event. Kim spoke about how healthcare professionals use the weekly tweetchat as a platform to learn and engage with consumers. Kim did the OzDOC community proud with her talk, using her time to accurately crystalise the very essence of the power and influence of an online network.

It’s these people that are the reason I love these sorts of conferences – and their like-minded attitude, and endless promotion of the importance of the consumer voice and the value of using social to connect, inform and support. This is mostly a huge positive, but it does get me thinking that the people who should also be in the room probably aren’t. Organisation CEOs need to be better represented to be taken on the journey of why HCSM cannot be dismissed as ‘the way of the future, so we’ll get to it soon’, but rather ‘It’s here. We need to Do.It.Now.’ This would inform a true real top down / bottom up approach to embracing healthcare social media within their organisations.

The diabetes contingent: Me, Kim and Mel

The underlying message of the conference – at least for me – was reinforcement of something that I have known and promoted for a long time: health social networks bring people together. Before online social platforms, we did it face-to-face. The message of the ‘modern day kitchen table’ was brought home to me again and again and again, and I understood that the barriers to using social are absolutely not insurmountable – despite feeling that way at times with all the justifying we seem to have to do.

And the message of ‘Connected communities get more done’, rang so true. I thought to the first morning of the conference when I was late because I’d been moderating an hour of the 24 hour World Diabetes Day tweetchat, talking diabetes stigma with people from all over the world, affected by diabetes. I thought to the Spare a Rose; Save a Child campaign. I thought about #DSMA and #DeDOC and #OzDOC and all the ways that our own diabetes community connects to get things done.

My conference fees for the two days of the #MayoInOz conference were covered through the consumer scholarship program. I was not expected to write anything in exchange for the scholarship. Thank you to the organisers of the event, Consumer Health Forum Australia and Melissa Cadzow for the scholarship. You can read more about the conference by clicking on this link for tweets.


Today, I gave a talk to healthcare professionals at a hospital in outer Melbourne. I was invited months ago after the organisers heard me speak at another event, and they wanted me to speak about living with diabetes.

As I said in the introduction to my talk, I am dead boring. Plus, I am only one voice. So, to create some balance and some interest, I reached out through Facebook and asked this:

screen-shot-2016-11-23-at-2-18-07-pm

As usual, the online community didn’t disappoint. I had over forty responses and weaved them into my presentation, adding real impact to what I was saying, reinforcing my comments with the comments of others walking a similar path of life with diabetes.

I started by asking the audience a question…

screen-shot-2016-11-23-at-2-14-31-pm

And then I said that I would be talking about life with diabetes. Except, I reminded the audience that life with diabetes was very different depending on where in the world you were diagnosed and that my story is about my ‘first world diabetes’ and I checked my privilege almost as a disclaimer.

I used that point in my talk as an opportunity to speak about those who cannot access or afford insulin and how this is simply, not okay. I could sense the surprise in the room as I said that people are dying because of lack of access.

 

Then I spoke about what diabetes is to me and here is what I said:

screen-shot-2016-11-23-at-2-17-18-pm

It’s boring and tedious and frustrating.

experts

It’s made me an expert. And that we need our HCPs to acknowledge the hours and hours and effort we put into managing our own brand of diabetes and the expertise we develop from living so closely with this condition.

images-2

It’s about humour – because laughing is a tool I use to get through this and that’s okay.

jrwiv9f2It’s about words, because language matters and sticks with us forever.

screen-shot-2016-11-23-at-2-30-00-pm

It’s about stigma. I asked if they could think of another condition that was so stigmatised and surrounded by blame – and that while we experience it with type 1 diabetes, I said that I believed my brothers and sisters with type 2 diabetes have it so much worse.

2it0mqr

It’s invisible – despite the bright blue patch surrounding my Dexcom, most of the time it is hidden away and not on show for all to see.

tumblr_nqiflsaApX1t9nvefo1_1280

It’s about people and community and the DOC and the people that are like the air I breathe – without whom I would not be managing at all.

15094981_10154707517290789_1700186650275823183_n

It’s about my family. And then I explained, fighting back tears, that this is the hardest part of life with diabetes for me. I’ve written about it a lot, spoken about it often. But thinking about how diabetes impacts on Aaron and the kidlet breaks – absolutely shatters – my heart into pieces. The worry I cause my parents makes me feel guilty and resentful. And every day I regret the time I told my sister that my life expectancy had been cut thanks to my type 1 diagnosis because I will never forget the look in her eyes indicating the pain I had just caused her.

I answered a couple of questions and then my talk was done. I thanked the audience for listening, stepped down from the stage, took a deep breath. Someone came up to me as I was gathering my bags and said that she learnt more about real life with diabetes in that talk than in all her years nursing.

This is the power of story telling. The comments I read out and shared have so much power in them. We need to keep telling our stories, turning the way we talk about diabetes on its head. It’s not about the numbers, the tools or anything else. It is about people.

Thank you so much to everyone who shared their comments with me on my Facebook post yesterday and today. 

Follow Diabetogenic on WordPress.com

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Read about Renza

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.

Twitter Updates

Archives

%d bloggers like this: