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The three most important women in my life are forces of nature: My mother, president of union, has instilled in me a desire to do work that helps others. My sister, the fiercest, feistiest, smartest person I know, who constantly challenges me to think outside my comfort zone. And my daughter – my amazing, miracle kid, (and kids like her) – is why I feel that the world is actually going to be okay.

The supporting cast of close family – mother-in-law who just happens to be an Australian aviation pioneer, my sister-in-law, aunts, cousins – and friends means that I am constantly surrounded by brilliant women doing brilliant things. I am astounded, daily, at the challenges they overcome, their triumphs, the lives they change, the impact they are making.

And in my diabetes life it is women – the incredible women – who keep me going and keep me motivated. My diabetes healthcare team is made up exclusively of women who truly breathe the whole person-centred care belief system, building me up and then supporting me as I do the best I can with diabetes. The women I have worked with, and continue to work with, in diabetes organisations who champion those who would otherwise be forgotten have become friends, mentors and daily cheerleaders.

It is people like Cherise Shockley, founder of DSMA; Dana Lewis, creator of Open APS; Susan Alberti, philanthropist; Jane Speight, diabetes language forerunner; Taryn Black, Diabetes Australia policy director and champion for having the voice of PWD heard; Riva Greenburg, journalist, changing the way we see people living with diabetes; Annie Astle, advocate and speaker, and the person I am most grateful to have come to know because of diabetes; Monique Hanley, cycling legend; Christel Marchand Aprigliano, advocate leader; Cheryl Steele, CDE extraordinaire and leader in diabetes technology education; Kerri Sparling, author, blogger and incredible advocate; Anna Norton, Sarah Mart and Karen Graffeo, the women behind Diabetes Sisters; Melissa Lee, incredible communicator, singer, former leader of DHF and now at Bigfoot Biomedical; Kelly Close, founder of diaTribe and Close Concerns; Georgie Peters, speaker, blogger, diabetes and eating disorders advocate…

And you know what? I haven’t even scratched the surface. The diabetes world is shaped by women, built by women, sustained by women. Advocacy efforts are often the brainchild and then led through the blood sweat and tears of women. And how lucky the world is!


I celebrate these women today and every day!

More writing about women and diabetes, and women’s health.

Hear Me Roar

This is what Diabetes Privilege Looks Like

The F Word

One Foot in Front of the Other

My Fantastic Frankie

A New Diabetes Superhero

The Sex Talk

Pink Elephants

The D Girls

Healthy Babies




Have you been thinking about making a donation to Spare a Rose; Save a Child, but just haven’t managed to do it yet? Did you think that because Valentine’s Day is over that it’s too late? Watch this and find out why your donation is still greatly needed.

Donate now to have your donation added to the 2018 Spare a Rose tally. Just click on the image below.

New year, new jumble. And lots of saved links from the last few weeks to share.

#OzDOC 2.0

Did you know that after OzDOC had it’s ‘final’ tweetchat at the beginning of December last year, it’s had a reboot and is now continuing to go at a great rate. David Burren (AKA Bionic Wookiee) kicked off the chat but is looking for people to volunteer to the moderators’ roster. There’s a brand new Twitter account to follow (@OzDOC_host), but the #OzDOC hashtag continues to shine brightly.

Same #OzDOC time, same #OzDOC channel. (i.e. Tuesdays at 8.30pm AEDT)

And while we’re talking tweetchats…

…make sure you keep an eye out on the #GBDOC tweetchats, which also had a bit of a restart last year and are going absolutely brilliantly. Follow @GbdocTChost for topics and moderators.

Now is a great time for Aussies to participate in #GBDOC because with the time zone difference, the chat is on Thursday 8am AEDT…which is actually quite pleasant. (It all goes to pot and becomes more difficult when daylight saving kicks in/out in respective hemispheres in coming months, but for now, it’s certainly manageable!)

Jane’s profile

It’s no secret that I’m a huge fan of Professor Jane Speight and I make no apologies for mentioning her so frequently on this blog. She is truly a champion for and of people with diabetes and her pioneering work on diabetes and #LanguageMatters, and social stigma are changing the landscape for those of us living with diabetes.

Last week, a profile of Jane and her work was published in The Lancet. Congrats, Jane. I can’t imagine a more worthy recipient of this attention. Please keep on keeping on. I for one am very grateful to have you on our side!

Read the article here – it’s free, but you will need to register/log in to access it.

(Click photo for source)

Dear ‘patient’

I was really interested to read this BMJ Opinion piece about medical letters, with the writers suggesting that instead of addressing ‘report letters’ to referring (and other) doctors and HCPs, that they should be addressed directly to the person, CCing in the doctor who would ordinarily have been sent the letter.

I love that idea! My endo generally copies me in on anything she sends out to my other HCPs to keep me in the loop, but I think that actually writing directly to me is even better.

HCPs would need to completely reconsider the language they adopt, the terminology they use and the overall tone of the communication, and I believe that there is nothing that should be shared with another HCP about me that shouldn’t be shared directly with me.

Interesting idea. And interesting to see if it has legs…

Writing for Grumps

After writing for me a few weeks ago, I returned the favour and wrote a post for The Grumpy Pumper. (I think the deal he made was something like ‘I’ll show you mine if you show me yours’, so I had to come up with the goods.)

This is all part of Grumps’ attempts to get people with diabetes speaking about #TalkAboutComplications in an open and honest way to help reduce the shame that seem to go hand in hand with a complications diagnosis.

Get ready for Spare a Rose spam

This year’s campaign is about to kick off. And if you want to know why I support this campaign, here’s just one reason.

Hospital admissions and T1D study

Rebecca Munt from Flinders University is currently enrolled in a PhD at Flinders University and is looking for participants in her research.

The focus of her study is to explore the experiences of self-management for adults with type 1 diabetes in the hospital setting (when T1D is not the primary admission diagnosis). If you’re interested in participating in Rebecca’s study, have type 1 diabetes, are over 18 years of age and have been admitted to hospital within the last two to five years (not for diabetes), please call Rebecca on (08) 8201 5749 or email

(The project has Social Behavioural Research Ethics Committee approval from Flinders University.)

Future of medical conferences

I have been very vocal in recent years about the shortcomings of diabetes conferences, specifically the lack of involvement and engagement of people with diabetes as part of the planning, running and presenting of the conference. So this piece really resonated about why medical meetings need a revamp, and some ideas for what could be done differently.

(Click for original tweet)

Because #NothingAboutUsWithoutUs.

Does the story we know and love about Banting need a rewrite?

I was fascinated to watch the short documentary shared in this story which suggests that the frequently-told story of the discovery of insulin is missing out a critical part.

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…

This blog post by Sue Robins detailing two vastly different medical appointments is compelling – and quite heartbreaking –reading.

More D Merch

Totally true!

Click image to get your own!


Towards the end of last year, I wrote about some things happening online trying to encourage people to openly and freely speak about being diagnosed and living with diabetes-related complications.

When conversations about diabetes complications are brought into the public domain, often two things happen.

Firstly, people start to talk. That whole cornerstone of peer support – reducing isolation and sharing stories – flings doors and windows wide open, and people, often gingerly at first, start to offer their own experiences. Inevitably, someone will say that they don’t speak about their complications because they fear the judgement that will follow. Or that they believe they are the only one their age facing complications because they have never met another person, or read a blog post from another person sharing a similar experience.

Secondly – and most damagingly – there is judgement. And it comes in spades, often sending some of those who had started to open up retreating back into the depths of diabetes taboos. This is not helpful for anyone.

So I wasn’t surprised when, during a useful discussion starting online about living with diabetes related complications – which resulted in some people willingly talking about their own experiences – the horribly judgemental comments started infiltrating the conversation.

I shared this post that I wrote almost five years ago about why we need to reconsider the way we speak about diabetes complications as I thought it was relevant to the current online conversation. In fact, everything I wrote in that post was still true because diabetes continues to be a terribly stigmatised condition and, within that, those of us living with complications seem to face additional stigma and judgement.

If for one second anyone doesn’t believe that statement, here are just some of the comments that I received (on LinkedIn and Twitter) after sharing the post:

‘If considering that many people who are type 2 diabetic quite simply exercise too little and eat too much fat…… which has immense financial consequences for the provision of healthcare…….. how else do you propose to get these people to lose weight and stop emburdening (sic) themselves on our NHS? If you take away the need to shame them you take away the most powerful way of making them take responsibility for their health.’

‘Sorry Renza but if we get complications of diabetes then we have failed. We are each responsible for own health and must try to maintain it at all cost.’

‘Diabetic complications do not happen with ‘perfect’ blood sugars. I agree that we must be supportive and sympathetic and the insulins available don’t help but it’s still the patient’s responsibility and not the doctors. Sorry if this doesn’t bode well with you.’

Is it any wonder that people are reticent to speak about developing complications if people are thinking like this?

I have written before that I believe diabetes has an image problem, because I can’t think of any other health condition that, if a treatment does not get the desired outcome, the person living with that condition is blamed. I have never heard someone being blamed if the cancer for which they are being treated does not end up in remission. I don’t know of anyone with rheumatoid arthritis who is blamed if their pain increases or their mobility decreases. I’ve not heard of someone with psoriasis being accused of not caring for themselves if their skin flares up.

But all bets are off when it comes to diabetes and fingers are pointed fairly and squarely in the face of the person living with diabetes if they develop complications.

Diabetes complications happen. It is, unfortunately, a reality for many people living with diabetes. I’m not trying to be negative or scare people, but we know that the longer we live with diabetes, the more likely we are to develop complications.

In this post, The Grumpy Pumper says: ‘Complications are a hazard of what we have. Not a failing of what we do.’ Maybe if we take that as the starting point we can take away the blame. And maybe if we take away the blame, we break down the stigma. And maybe if we break down the stigma, we can start having a real discussion about how we treat complications if they develop, and get to treating them.

And maybe if we stop thinking that developing diabetes and anything that happens after living with it is a shortcoming we can stop feeling so judged and shamed, because others will stop judging and shaming us.More to read on this topic:

Melissa Lee wrote this piece.

Riva Greenberg shared this one.

Sarah K from Sugarbetic wrote this. 

And this from Mel Seed.


It’s 42 degrees Celsius today – or about a million and a half degrees Fahrenheit. We can all agree that it is hot.

So, obviously, it’s a great day to move offices.

As I have unpacked and started to set up my new space I’ve been piling together bits and pieces collected from DOC get togethers. Which means that as I sit here in my office overlooking the city skyline, I actually have around me friends from all over the globe.

And my world once again feels that little bit smaller. And I, in my corner of Melbourne, feel part of something so much bigger.

‘Grumps? Grumps? When are you writing for me?’

Last year, The Grumpy Pumper wrote a couple of posts for me in what was going to be semi-regular series called What Would Grumpy Do? Actually, the idea that it was going to be a semi-regular thing was news to Grumps, and because he doesn’t like to be told what to do, it’s been over a year between posts. 

Earlier in the month we were in Abu Dhabi at #IDF2017 together, and every second thing I said to him was a variation of ‘When are you writing for me again? Grumps? Grumps? Grumps? Hey, write something. Now! Grumps?’ As it turns out, four days of me asking the same thing yields results. Who knew?

So here’s Grumps’ recent diabetes complications story. and his efforts to get people talking about complications to reduce stigma.

Off you go, Sir Grump-a-lot…


‘I’m afraid you have a diabetic complication Mr Pumper.’

(I’ve had the language matters talk, don’t panic)

How would you feel if you heard this? What would you do?

Well, at that point in time, I asked myself: What Would Grumpy Do?

To set the scene…

I had a bloody great hole in my foot.

I was at the podiatrist.

So, let’s face it, I did not fall off the chair in shock.

The conversation went something like this:

Grumps: What kind of complication? You can tell me straight. It’s my foot, right?

(Cue eye rolling by podiatrist. I don’t blame her. Dealing with me is a challenge at the best of times.)

Podiatrist: Yes. It’s an ulcer.

Grumps: Caused by the blister I told you about that burst, healed over but must have had some crap in the wound?

Podiatrist: Yes, that’s it.

Grumps: So it’s caused by my diabetes then?

Podiatrist: Oh no, not the blister, but your neuropathy means it will take longer to heal.

Grumps: So that big hole in my foot isn’t a complication of my diabetes; it’s complicated by my diabetes?

Podiatrist: Well. I guess so…

Me being me, I don’t care what it’s called, nor how I’m told, because if I’m totally honest it doesn’t bother me. Not much does. I’ll take whatever comes, deal with it and move on.

But I wanted to make a point. Things can be viewed very differently depending on who you are and how you feel about things. And how you feel about things can depend on how things are worded – that can massively influence things.

Anyway, to cut a short story long, a precautionary X-ray and a consultant later it was confirmed that there was no bone infection, which was good. It also showed that about a year ago I had broken two bones at the top of my foot and also smashed the joint in one of my toes – fuck knows how. (I remember a lot of swelling in the foot and bruising.)

Instead of healing, the bone had degenerated and gone ‘chalky’. Over time that hardened and went back to solid bone (as I understand it). So the toe joint isn’t a joint now, and the foot is slightly warped (just like my sense of humour). The Charcot (the chalky thing) is no longer active, but I am at risk of it happening again if I get another trauma to the foot.

All of which is good!

Why the hell would I think any of that was good?

The hole in my foot uncovered all the other stuff, so to be honest, I’m glad I got it. If I hadn’t, I would still not know. The Charcot isn’t active so there is nothing that needs to be fixed. I now know that if I get similar symptoms, or become aware of any trauma, I need to get it looked at ASAP. And I know the route to make sure that happens.

So, all good in my book.

I went home and did what any self-respecting Grumps would do: I waited until it was dinner time in the UK and then posted a gross picture of my foot for all to see. I described the issue and raised the subject of my complications.

This sparked a very good online discussion about compilations with other PWD talking about theirs and others seeing that they are not the only one with them. And there is no shame in having them. Sharing experiences and taking comfort from others; for me, that’s what peer support is about.

We are all in the same boat. It’s just that the boat is full of holes. If we try to bail out the incoming water on our own, at some point we will drown. It we help each other; we can keep our heads above the water.

I am not ashamed about my complications. I never will be!

I will Grumpily tell everyone that wants to listen, and post disgusting pics that pop up on your social media feeds just as you are about to tuck into your favourite meal.

I’m not sorry about this!

Complications are a hazard of what we have.

Not a failing of what we do.


Live Long and Bolus


Grumps’ snazzy new footwear.

Want more from The Grumpy Pumper? Check out his blog here. And follow him on Twitter here

I was thrilled and honoured to speak in the symposium at #IDF2017 all about peer support. I shared the program with Chris Aldred, better known to all as The Grumpy Pumper, and advocate Dr Phylissa Deroze (you can – and should – find her as @not_defeated on Twitter).

Speakers in the peer support symposium at #IDF2017

When we were putting together the program for the symposium, the idea was that it would offer an overview of what peer support can look like, beginning with how diabetes organisations and community health groups can facilitate and offer a variety of peer support options, and rounding up with the perspectives of people with diabetes who provide and participate in peer support.

I spoke about how diabetes organisations in Australia, through the NDSS, offer a suite of peer support choices, urging the audience to think beyond the usual face-to-face or, increasingly, online peer support group. Activities such as camps for children and adolescents with diabetes, information events, education sessions (such as DAFNE) are all avenues for peer support. Peer support need not only take the form of a group of people sitting in a (real or virtual) room talking about diabetes in a structured or unstructured way. It can happen just by putting people with diabetes in the same space.

I’d never met Phylissa before, but I quickly learnt she is the definition of the word determined. She spoke eloquently about her own type 2 diabetes diagnosis which was anything but ideal. Instead of feeling beaten and overcome by how she had been let down by the healthcare system, she turned to her peers, finding a group that not only helped her diabetes management, but also gave her confidence to live well with diabetes.

Phylissa now facilitates an in-person support group for women with diabetes in Al Ain in the UAE, and is a huge supporter of, and believer in, the power and importance of peer to peer engagement and support in diabetes management. You can read more about Phylissa’s work on her website here.

Grumps, in true Grumps style, gave a talk about how his approach to peer support is more organic and certainly not especially structured. Although involved in some more planned peer support, he believes the most effective way he can support others with diabetes is on an individual, more informal way. Kind of like this:

Click image to see tweet.

And as if putting into practise his talk at the Congress, last week he started a conversation on Twitter about his own recent experiences of being diagnosed with an ulcer in his foot opening the door for people to speak about diabetes complications.

Click image to see tweet.

The way we speak about diabetes-related complications is often flawed. The first we hear of them is around diagnosis and they are held over us as a threat of the bad things to come if we don’t do as we are told. They are also presented to us with the equation of: Well-managed-diabetes + doing-what-the-doctors-say = no complications.

Unfortunately, it’s not that easy.

From then on, complications are spoken of in hushed-voices or accusations. Blame is apportioned to those who develop them: obviously, they failed to take care of themselves.

And because of this, for many people, the diagnosis of a diabetes-related complication is accompanied by guilt, shame and feelings of failure when really, the response should be offers of support, the best care possible and links to others going through the same thing. Peer support.

Back to Grumps’ raising diabetes complications on Twitter. After sharing his own story, suggested that we should not be ashamed to talk about complications.

That was the catalyst others needed to begin volunteering their own stories of complications diagnoses. Suddenly, people were openly speaking about diabetes complications in a matter-of-fact, open way – almost as if speaking about the weather. Some offered heartfelt sympathies, others shared tips and tricks that help them. But the overall sentiments were those of support and camaraderie.

The recurring theme of the peer support symposium at the Congress was that we need to find others we can connect with in a safe space so we can speak about the things that matter to us. It’s not the role of any organisation or HCP to set the agenda – the agenda needs to be fluid and follow whatever people with diabetes need.


While we’re talking peer support, how great is it to see that the weekly OzDOC tweetchat is getting a reprise this week, with Bionic Wookiee, David Burren at the helm. Drop by if you are free at the usual time: Tuesday evening at 8.30pm (AEDT). I’ll be there!


I was the Deputy Lead for the Living with Diabetes Stream, and an invited speaker at the 2017 IDF Congress. The International Diabetes Federation covered my travel and accommodation costs and provided me with registration to attend the Congress.

Last week, I received an email informing me that the weekly #OzDOC tweet chats would be coming to a close. Obviously, I thought of it as a sad announcement, but what a fantastic five years and five months of weekly conversations and support!

It takes a lot of dedication to run a diabetes support group, and the regular tweet chat format of #OzDOC meant that it was a once-a-week commitment, requiring a roster of interesting and engaging topics, and someone to direct the conversation and make sure that there was someone welcoming anyone who wanted to participate each and every week.

It takes work, time and effort, and, in most cases, support groups are run by volunteers who already have jobs and busy lives and families. The support group administration and activities are run in someone’s own time.

But despite what it takes – the planning, the commitment and the energy – there has been someone there since the beginning, taking responsibility to make sure that the #OzDOC tweet chat bus kept going. And that person is Kim Henshaw.

Kim talking #OzDOC at last year’s #MayoInOz meeting.

When the #OzDOC tweet chats started, there were three of us involved: Kim, Simon and me. We took it in turns each week to moderate the chat, come up with the questions and run ideas by each other. But circumstances change, and first I, then Simon needed to step back from being part of the moderating team.

Kim stayed on and has been the one responsible for herding the #OzDOC kittens and creating a safe, fun, supportive, reassuring online space for people in the Australian diabetes community to come together on Twitter each week. With a team of moderators, the chats continued.

Kim’s commitment to #OzDOC could never be questioned. In the very first tweet chat, back in July 2012, she was sent to Twitter jail for tweeting and retweeting too many times in the hour! She wanted to share as widely as she could, acknowledge as many comments from others as possible and encourage conversation at every turn. Until she was cut off from Twitter:


Kim never wavered from her pledge to build and support the community. I shared the power of #OzDOC every chance I had – any time I was speaking about diabetes peer support, #OzDOC got a mention; I’ve written about it here over and over and over again. And I defended online channels and Twitter as a support platform, using #OzDOC as an example of just how a community could be developed.

But times change, and with Kim stepping aside and no one else available to take on the coordination of the group, next week will be the final time that the @OzDiabetesOC account is used for the #OzDOC hour of power.

I wanted to say a huge thank you to everyone who has been involved in the OzDOC tweet chats for the last (almost) five and a half years. I have met some incredible people through the chats, made some wonderful friends and learnt so, so much.

And mostly, I wanted to say thank you to Kim for delicately, dedicatedly and devotedly running the group. What a wonderful thing you created, Kim. Well done! Enjoy your quiet Tuesday nights – you deserve it!

Last week, a recipe was posted on the Medtronic Australia Facebook page. The recipe was for a Chocolate Tim Tam Cake, which looked rather gooey and very chocolate-y.

I was looking for something to bake over the weekend, but decided that this cake wasn’t really the sort of baking I was up to, so I scrolled on, searching for the right recipe for my baking adventures.

But for some reason, I kept seeing the recipe appear in my FB feed, a couple of times because it had been posted in some of the LCHF groups I follow.

And then I did what I know I shouldn’t do. I looked at the comments, and down the rabbit whole of the very angry LCHF brigade I tumbled.

I am always very wary when it comes to dietary advice. I don’t follow the Australian Dietary Guidelines because I find the quantity of carbs recommended is just simply too difficult for my non-functioning pancreas. Or rather, for my (frequently barely-functioning) brain which has to act like my non-functioning pancreas. Also, I just don’t really want to have to bolus large quantities of insulin in one go. But that’s just me.

Equally, I don’t follow a paleo diet or I Quit Sugar or Dr Bernstein because anything that is so prescriptive is never going to work for me. Instead, I pick and choose what I know will work for me and, more importantly, what I can manage sustainably. I couldn’t really care less what other people with diabetes (or people without diabetes) eat, because I’m far too concerned with my own diabetes existence. And being obsessed with the @TrumpGoogles Insta account

In exactly the same way I would never accept a HCP who judged what people eat or the tools people choose to manage their diabetes, I don’t take too kindly to other PWD (or anyone, really) suggesting that people who prefer to eat in a certain way are ‘killing themselves’. This is what was happening in the case of the recipe posted by Medtronic.

You can read the comments yourself (the post is here), or you can just assume that they all had to do with the criminality of a company daring to post the recipe while suggesting that people with diabetes might want a piece of cake. And varying versions of ‘you might as well just kill yourself’.

I’m not bagging the LCHF movement and anyone who fully subscribes to it. But I am calling out the frequent aggressive and belligerent rhetoric of some LCHF folk. I’ve had more than enough disrespectful and rude comments sent my way anytime I write about food or share recipes. Despite that, I’m not for a minute suggesting that the way you are choosing to eat is harmful, in fact, I completely agree that eating LCHF is one way for some people to best manage their diabetes. I know a significant number of people of have changed to this way of eating and they have found the results to be incredibly positive.

I also know a significant number of people who simply haven’t found it to be the right thing for them. Some say they have found it unsustainable, others say they found it boring. Others say they are simply not interested because they found it too restrictive, or too expensive. And some say the results they saw simply didn’t warrant the effort they needed to put in.

I know that for me, exclusively following a LCHF diet doesn’t work because I just don’t do food restriction. I’ve never dieted in my life and I don’t do well with being told what I can and can’t eat. I also know that I can quite easily manage to limit my carbs to around 50 grams per day and that the results I have seen since doing that have been worth the effort for me. I also know that all carbs are not created equal and I try to be smart about what I choose to make up those 50g (or so).

Oh – and mostly I know that sometimes…sometimes, those 50 grams of carbs are going to be a doughnut. I’m okay with that. Doughnuts are delicious and bolus-worthy.

As I firmly and resolutely believe, everyone has the right to manage their diabetes in a way that works for them. And they have a right to do that without being bothered by others. Being told that what you are eating is ‘poisoning your body’, or being told that the devices you are using are toxic helps no one.

Oh, and the personal attacks are also totally unnecessary. The person who sent me an aggressive FB message after seeing this profile photo can just pull their head in. I ate a few bites of chocolate cake (the best chocolate cake ever), not ‘poison’. And yes – even after eating those few bites, I still have both my legs, and my kidneys continue to work just fine. But thanks for asking.

Eat how you want. Let others eat how they want. It’s really not that hard.

For the record – this is what I made on Saturday evening. (This one went to the neighbours, but I also made a smaller one for home.) It’s a blueberry crostata. I added a little ricotta underneath the fruit and made a ridiculously buttery pastry to hold it all together. Super easy. Super delicious. (And my CGM trace peaked at 7.3mmol/l for anyone wondering…)

I flew into Lisbon, arriving at my hotel just after midnight on Monday. I get that Australia is a long way from everywhere, but the 38 hours’ transit was a record for me and as I tumbled into bed, I dreaded the alarm that would sound a mere 6 hours away.

However, I’ve done this enough times now to know a sure-fire way to overcome jet lag is to organise a relatively early morning meeting that involves coffee and local pastries. (Hello, Pastelaria Versailles and thank you for your beautiful baked goods.)

The main reason for this trip was to attend the Roche #DiabetesMeetup. (Disclosures? Yep-all at the end of this post….) This is the third one of these meetings I’ve attended (read about the first one at EASD2016 here and the next at ATTD2017 here) and, as always, it was great to see the familiar faces of dynamic diabetes advocates doing dynamic diabetes advocacy.

This year, there were a whole lot of new faces, with over 60 diabetes bloggers from across Europe having been invited to become part of the conversation. As well as attended the dedicated satellite ‘consumer’ events, the bloggers are all given press passes to attend all of EASD.

This is astounding. It means that it is impossible to walk around the conference centre without seeing other people with diabetes. Arms adorned with CGM or Libre are not startling – they’re everywhere. The beeps and vibrations of pumps can be heard in sessions, causing heads to bob up, and knowing glances to be shared. Our presence here is undeniable.

On the first official day of the EASD meeting, the third annual #DOCDAY event was held. While Bastian Hauck (the event organiser) starts by inviting bloggers to the event, he warmly and enthusiastically extends the invitation to HCPs and industry too.

On Tuesday, the room was full of people, discussion and enthusiasm

#DOCDAY has become a platform for anyone who attends to take the stage, and five minutes, to share what they’ve been up to in the diabetes advocacy and support space. I stepped down from my usual language soap box, proving that this pony does indeed have more than one trick.

Instead, I spoke about the role of people with diabetes at diabetes conferences. I couldn’t think of a more appropriate time, or a more suitable room to plead my case, even though I knew that I was preaching to a very converted choir!

Two weeks ago, in Perth, there were a few of us wandering the #ADSADEA conference as part of the Diabetes Australia People’s Voice team. And at one point, on Twitter, where our presence is felt more than anywhere else, an interesting, frustrating and downright offensive (if I’m being honest) discussion started.

It was said that diabetes conferences are the safe place of diabetes healthcare professionals and that perhaps a day at the start of the conference could be dedicated to people with diabetes, but the delegate program (delegates being only HCPs) start the next day.

As you can imagine, that didn’t go down too well with some of the diabetes advocates in attendance.

I am actually unable to provide you with the arguments offered as to why people with diabetes should be excluded, but I think it included reasons such as HCPs need a space to be among peers, these are scientific conferences, HCPs need lectures without people with diabetes (not sure why – are we really that terrifying?).

I’m not into preventing people with diabetes attending diabetes conferences. Melinda Seed’s vision of 1000 people with diabetes at the conference is far more aligned with mine. We are not asking that the conference we ‘dumbed down’. I don’t want the sessions to be any different than they are now (with the exception of having PWD as part of the speaker list – but that is regardless of who is in the audience).

Here’s the thing. Organising a team of three consumers to attend (as happened in Australia) required someone to provide funding and coordination. That was Diabetes Australia and I’m really proud that the organisation I work for created this initiative.

To have over sixty advocates supported takes a commitment. I won’t for one moment suggest that I am naïve enough to believe that we are part of industry’s marketing strategy. But we absolutely should be part of that strategy. I am more than happy to give Roche the shout out and kudos they absolutely deserve for bringing us all together. I don’t use any of their products at the moment (although, in the past have used their meters), so I’m not in any way spruiking their devices or suggesting you go and update your meter with one of theirs.

But I am grateful that as part of their engagement with people with diabetes involves bringing us together at a diabetes conference.

What’s the role of people with diabetes at diabetes conferences? Our role is to share from inside with those not here. We’re here to remind attendees that using language that diminishes us and our experiences and efforts in living with diabetes is not okay. We’re here to tell industry they’ve messed up when they design is not spot on, or their marketing misses the mark. We’re here to challenge the idea that we should be quiet, ‘compliant’ and do what we are told.

As I said at #DOCDAY, we have a responsibility to share what we learn. I acknowledge – every single minute of every single conference day – that I am privileged to be here. And that comes with responsibility to share what I see, hear and learn.


My flights and accommodation costs to attend EASD2017 have been covered by Roche Diabetes Care (Global). Yesterday I attended the Roche #DiabetesMeetup (more on that to come). Roche also provided me with press registration to attend ATTD. My agreement to attend their blogger day did not include any commitment from me, or expectation from them, to write about the day or their products.

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